Greek Course Descriptions

GREK 111 Beginning Greek I (4)
This is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to enable students to read ancient Greek, including both Attic and Koine dialects. Over the course of the year we will learn the principle elements of Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Students also will have an opportunity to read the New Testament in its original Greek text and to develop and understanding of the historical and theological perspectives that shaped it. No prerequisite.

GREK 112 Beginning Greek II (4)
This is the second course in a two-course sequence designed to enable students to read ancient Greek, including both Attic and Koine dialects. Over the course of the year we will learn the principle elements of Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Students also will have an opportunity to read the New Testament in its original Greek text and to develop and understanding of the historical and theological perspectives that shaped it. Prerequisite is GREK 111 or permission of the instructor. (Replaces GREK 115/116)

GREK 202 Reading Group in Greek (0-1)
Selected readings deal with world languages and cultures. Texts read may be classics in a national literature, works by writers who recently won a high literary prize, or texts dealing with current topics critical to the history or politics of a particular country. Texts may be tied to on-campus lectures on world literature by invited speakers. This course can be repeated once for credit with the permission of the chair. Offered for S/U grading only.

GREK 211 Intermediate Greek (4)
This course will offer students a review of key grammatical concepts in ancient Greek and an opportunity to build advanced reading skills through substantial exposure to Classical Greek authors such as Plato. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the core foreign language proficiency. Prerequisite is GREK 112 or permission of the instructor. (Replaces GREK 116)

GREK 271 Individual Learning Project (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

GREK 302 Reading Group in Greek (0-1)
Selected readings deal with world languages and cultures. Texts read may be classics in a national literature, works by writers who recently won a high literary prize, or texts dealing with current topics critical to the history or politics of a particular country. Texts may be tied to on-campus lectures on world literature by invited speakers. This course can be repeated once for credit with the permission of the chair. Offered for S/U grading only.

GREK 327 Topics in Greek Literature (4)
A selected topic in Greek literature, such as the Attic orators, lyric poetry, the novel, church literature, or prose composition. This course may be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

GREK 332 Topics in Greek Historians (4)
Reading of one or more Greek historians, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. Emphasis on methodology, style, function of speeches, views of causality, origins of war, and the weighing and presentation of evidence. This course may be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

GREK 332A Greek Historians: Herodotus (4)
Herodotus of Halicarnassus, the “Father of History,” was the first historian in human civilization, invented this new discipline as he went along, and didn’t know that history is supposed to be boring! In fact, the Greek word historia is the origin not only of English “history” but also of “story.” We will read all of Herodotus’s history of the war between the Greeks and the Persians in translation, and as much of it in Greek as we can get through in a semester.

GREK 332B Greek Historians: Thucydides (4)
Thucydides is the second historian in human history, and unlike Herodotus, the “Father of History,” Thucydides went to great lengths to get all the facts exactly right and to eliminate bias from his work. His analysis of the great Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta is still studied by statesmen and military strategists as well as historians. We will read and analyze the most famous passages of his history with a view to understanding how Thucydides understood events of his own time and how his work gives us insight into our own time.

GREK 341 Homer and Epic Poetry (4)
A detailed analysis of the Odyssey or the Iliad; the entire work in translation, selected readings in the original. The oral epic and Homer's influence on Greek morality, culture, and literature.

GREK 342 Greek Tragedy (4)
Reading of one or more plays by Sophocles, Euripides, or Aeschylus read in the original, and several in translation, noting each poet's outlook and dramatic technique.

GREK 345 Studies in Plato (4)
Reading of one or more Platonic dialogues (such as the Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Symposium) with emphasis on the technique of the Socratic dialogue, prose style, Plato's view of the soul, and the theory of forms.

GREK 347 Aristophanes (4)
Reading of one or more comedies in Greek and several in English translation.

GREK 371 Individual Learning Project (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

GREK 398 Honors Senior Essay, Research, or Creative Project (4)
Required for graduation with "Distinction in Classics." Prerequisite: COLG 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see COLG 398. COLG 396 and 398 may be applied to the Classics major, if the topic is appropriate.

GREK 399 Senior Capstone (2)
All majors must present a senior project in a public forum. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students choose a project appropriate to their previous course of study and/or their individual goals. Students completing 398 on a topic relevant to their Classics major do not need to complete GREK 399.