Please update your web browser or disable Compatibility View.

Descriptions_MATH-THEO

Quick Find:   M   N   P   S   T

MATHEMATICS

MATH 340A  Mathematical Modelling in Biology
Cross-listed with BIOL 373L
Traditional approaches to mathematical modelling in biology have relied primarily on differential equations models.  However, new approaches have and are being developed that rely instead on discrete methods, such as those coming from graph theory, polynomial manipulation and elementary linear algebra.  For example, gene regulatory networks have been successfully modelled using Boolean logic. The spread of tick-borne diseases and methods of control have been well described using agent-based models. Graph theoretic models have been used to explore aspects of neuronal network connectivity.

This course will survey a variety of discrete modelling approaches, including Boolean models, polynomial dynamical systems, graph theory, agent based modelling, and hidden Markov models.  Emphasis will be on examples and applications, which will be drawn from various areas of biology, including problems in gene regulation, population dynamics and neuroscience. The necessary mathematical background will be included in the course.
Prerequisite: Math 119 or permission of instructor

NUTRITION

NUTR 260B: Physiology of Weigh Regulation
An overview of physiological processes that contribute to the regulation of body weight in humans. Focus will be placed on adipose tissue hormones and gut hormones, the role of gut bacteria in energy harvest, the influence of viruses on adiposity and the impact of exercise on substances involved in weight regulation. Students will be expected to read and interpret technical journal articles.

NUTR 260C: Sensory Evaluation of Food
Principles and procedures for sensory evaluation of food/ Appropriate uses of specific tests are discussed, along with physiological, psychological, and environmental factors affecting sensory verdicts.

PEACE STUDIES

PCST 368E:  Justice, Peace & Reconciliation
Cross-listed with THEO 349D
From the Book of Exodus to the Hebrew prophets and the New Testament, one finds the utopian vision of a just, peaceful and reconciled world, summarized in the biblical term "shalom."  Through the study of biblical texts and contemporary writings, we will explore the Judeo-Christian tradition's vision of justice, peace and reconciliation.  Through the analysis of case studies we will explore how individuals, organizations and communities in the tradition are working to bring about shalom in various parts of the world through such means as nonviolent action, the defense of human rights, methods to conflict resolution and transformation, and efforts for peacebuilding and reconciliation

PCST 368K: Masculinities in War & Peace
In this course we will examine the multiple definitions and constructions of masculine identity that emerge from human experiences with war and peace. We will examine the Warrior as the archetype of masculinity, discuss alternative conceptions of masculine identity, and explore ways of rethinking masculinity to help build cultures of peace. We will also take a look at some of the complex interconnections between masculinities, gender, sex, and nationality.

PCST 368M:  Conflict & Peace in Africa
Our course will begin with a general introduction to the history of Sun-Saharan Africa (SSA) and a discussion of misperceptions and stereotypes. We then will identify where large-scale conflicts and civil wars have occurred in SSA, and explore what role such factors as resources, economics, ethnicity, gender, political institutions, environment and religion might play in these conflicts and their resolution. We also will discuss peacebuilding, transitional justice and reconciliation projects, and the challenges of democratization, human rights, development and globalization. After our overview of these topics we will focus on  the case studies Liberia and Sierra Leone; Somalia, Kenya and Sudan/South Sudan. Our readings primarily will be social science texts but also will include some fiction and documentaries.

PSYC 309F:  Animal Minds
This class will attempt to look inside the minds of animals. It's an interesting, fun, and constantly changing field that is very accessible. We will explore issues focusing on Animal Cognition, Consciousness, Emotion, and Morality; constantly looking across species lines for commonalities and differences. The psychological capacities of human infants, children, and adults will be compared with widely varied species to understand not only how animals think, but also what makes us different. We will also discuss evolutionary theories and scientific methodologies used to explore varied minds.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111

PSYC 309J:  Evolutionary Psychology
Aubrey Immelman
This course examines the major areas of psychology from an evolutionary perspective. We will, for example, look at sensory systems, emotions, interpersonal relationships, and mental disorders and ask question such as the following: Why did these particular attributes (i.e., adaptations) of human nature evolve? Why do all people in all cultures share similar sensory experiences, emotions, and developmental stages?

Specific topics of study: Evolutionary psychology (EP) vs. the standard social science model (SSSM); evolution by natural selection; the genetic basis of evolution; and major topic areas of psychology from an evolutionary perspective, including sensation and perception, consciousness, motivation and emotion, cognition, learning, individual differences (intelligence and personality), health, abnormal psychology, the psychology of human mate selection, families and development, social behavior, and culture.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111

PSYC 393:  Psychology Seminar:  Buddhist Psychology
Linda Tennison
This course will explore the interface between Western and Buddhist psychologies by a re-examination of traditional substantive areas in psychology including (but not limited to): historical development, research methodology and ways of knowing, neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, conditioning, cognition, motivation and emotion, personality, social interaction and psychopathology.  Class meetings will be spent discussing assigned readings from both the psychological and the Buddhist literature.  Students will select a psychological topic of interest, extensively research the topic from both perspectives, and prepare a term paper to be presented to the group.  In addition, students will receive basic instruction in mindfulness meditation and will be asked to adopt a daily practice, journaling their reactions and experiences, as an experiential component of the course. 
Prerequisite: 20 credits in PSYC; Junior or Senior Standing. Fulfills Psychology Capstone Requirement.

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 337I:  Anthropology and Global Health Challenges
This course explores global health from an anthropological perspective. It examines how medical anthropologists attempt to understand global health challenges within a larger historical, cultural, political, and  economic framework. This course will focus on ways in which anthropology can contribute to the understanding of and interventions for global health challenges in our time.  This course will pay special attention to child survival, infectious diseases, and reproductive health in the global south.

THEATER

THEA 218:  Readings in Culture & Dramatic Literature:  Chicana/Latino Drama
We will read plays by Latino/Chicana men and women and meet to discuss the story of each play.  Our discussions will range from the idea or "Message" of the play to the society and values we perceive within the story.  Each student will be responsible for leading the discussion in one of the classes; the last class period will be dedicated to assessment and suggestions for improving the course.

THEOLOGY

THEO 319F:  God, Human Beings and Salvation
At the heart of Christian faith lies the conviction that sinful human beings are redeemed and saved through Jesus Christ who introduces them into a new and grace-filled relationship with God.  While such a belief is universal to all Christians, the specific way in which redemption and salvation is understood has assumed varied expressions throughout the history of Christian thought.  This course will explore Christian attempts to understand human salvation with particular focus on the notion of "justification" - the movement of a person from a state of sin into a state of grace.  Central to this exploration will be the study of how God and human beings both play meaningful roles in the process of justification and the movement toward eternal life.  As they relate to this central theme, the course will also explore topics including Christ's role as savior, faith, grace, merit, sin, free will, and predestination.  Surveying justification from a historical perspective, the course will offer students the opportunity to compare and evaluate diverse viewpoints using skills and vocabulary acquired during the semester.

THEO 329D:  Theologies of Liberation
Liberation theology is the name for a well-known and, to some, notorious form of religious action and reflection that emerged in Latin American some forty years ago.  Today, it has now grown into a family of related though different theologies, which have similar methods, and which all start for the experience of oppression.  Although Latin American theology of liberation is perhaps the most influential expression of this relation in the twentieth century, other forms of religious reflection owe a debt to liberation theology, even as they add to the profundity of its insights. This course will begin with Latin American liberation theology and then turn to the work of black, feminist, womanist, U.S. Latino/a, gay/lesbian and ecological theologies to broaden our understanding of the relationship between the Gospels and the imperative to structural change in our society.

THEO 349A:  Family, Church, and Society
Drawing on historical, sociological, and religious sources, this course introduces students to a range of perspectives concerning the intersection of family, church and society, focusing on issues such as cohabitation, marriage, divorce, homosexuality, and gender roles.
PREREQUISITE: THEO 111 or HONR 240A

THEO 349D:  Justice, Peace & Reconciliation
Cross-listed with PCST 368E
From the Book of Exodus to the Hebrew prophets and the New Testament, one finds the utopian vision of a just, peaceful and reconciled world, summarized in the biblical term "shalom."  Through the study of biblical texts and contemporary writings, we will explore the Judeo-Christian tradition's vision of justice, peace and reconciliation.  Through the analysis of case studies we will explore how individuals, organizations and communities in the tradition are working to bring about shalom in various parts of the world through such means as nonviolent action, the defense of human rights, methods to conflict resolution and transformation, and efforts for peacebuilding and reconciliation

THEO 349E: Economic Thought & Religious Values
Cross-listed with ECON 327
An examination of how economic life has been viewed from the perspective of religion, particularly Western Christianity: from roots in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures, through the early church, middle ages and the Protestant Reformation, up to contemporary debates about free markets, Marxism, feminism and the social teaching of the Roman Catholic Church today.
PREREQUISITE:  ECON 111 & THEO 111

THEO 349J:  Justice in Sexuality & Relationships
Given the inescapable complexities surrounding human sexuality, gender, and embodiment, how might we live and relate to one another in ways that are increasingly fulfilling, and in ways that deepen our relationships with ourselves, others, and God? This course will introduce students to the methodology of Christian ethics, i.e., the process of drawing upon sources of knowledge (scripture, tradition, reason, and contemporary experience) to formulate responses to contemporary issues regarding sexuality and relationships. Specifically, we will be exploring the concept of justice as it relates to sex, contemporary hookup culture, love, and relationships. In the end, students will be equipped to construct and articulate a compelling theological sexual ethic for college students.

THEO 369B:  Modern Islam Political Movement
After providing an introduction to the beliefs, practices, and history of Islam, this course will analyze some of the relationships between Islam and politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries among Islamist (or "fundamentalist Islamic groups") in the Middle East, South Asia, and other parts of the world. Specifically, the course will examine the histories, ideologies, and structures of groups. This course will examine the religious, theological, and political, foundations of these groups while analyzing their work in education, literacy, social service to people in many sectors of societies (including the underprivileged), religious and political instruction, and community-building. The course will also explore the various perspectives of members of these groups and movements toward peace and violence as well as their religiously- and politically-based reasons for attacking various targets. Finally, the course will compare and contrast those Islamist trends with those represented by some liberal Muslims.