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ACCOUNTING & FINANCE

ACFN 337: Business Taxation Topics
Computation of tax, tax accruals, tax considerations on the formation and operation of businesses, and other tax topics. Includes on-line research of tax issues.
PREREQUISITE: ACFN 113

ACFN 395: Finance Capstone
An integrative academic experience which engages majors in research, identification of finance and business issues, assessment of alternatives, and support of proposed solutions. Students will develop analytical and problem-solving skills through application of finance and related concepts to case studies involving real-world issues.
PREREQUISITE: Senior standing, 310, 315 and 320. May be concurrently enrolled in either 315 or 320 and capstone.

ART

ART 233F: Printmaking
This is a hands on course working with the following printmaking processes.

  • Monotypes, a created image painted or drawn on a smooth surface and printed, and one of a kind print form.
  • A collagraph, a construction on a plate surface and printed.
  • Releif/Woodcut, a surface cut away and printed

There will be equal importance given to the importance to the creating and printing of images.

ART 240F: China in Focus:  Photography in China 1850-Present
By the 1840s the medium of photography had arrived in China.  Early photographers in China included Lai A Fong in Hong Kong, and Englishman John Thomson, whose later works document the plight of the poor in Victorian London.  The early years were followed by years of upheaval and then of propaganda-oriented images and exhibitions, particularly during the Cultural Revolution under Mao Zedong.  Since the 1980s, photography in China has emerged as a powerful tool for documenting and challenging the dramatic changes there.  During this course, you will explore some of the major themes addressed by Chinese photographers, such as urban problems, the shift from a rural to an urban environment, the transient nature of cities and their residents, and the fragile coexistence of tradition and popular culture in daily life.  The class will be a combination of lecture and discussion, focusing on the history of photography in China, visual analysis of the powerful images, and discussion of how the viewers' context plays a role in the understanding of the works.  Although the primary topic will be the history of photography as art in China by Chinese artists, the course will include a brief history of photography as art in the west and will also examine western photographers who focus on China as a subject.  In addition to doing close readings of primary texts (the photographs), the class will also investigate secondary texts with the aim of placing the photographs and the themes explored in the works in context.  


ART 240G: Renaissance and Baroque Art
The Renaissance in Europe was initially centered in Italy and is considered the "rebirth" of arts from Classical Greece and Rome.  This significant period of art history transitioned into the Baroque during and after the Reformation in Europe.  This course is a focus on the art history of the European Renaissance and Baroque periods, with an emphasis on identification and analysis of art and architecture, from 1400 to 1700 CE.  Art will be interpreted and discussed in terms of its social, religious, and political contexts during these key periods.  Arts examined during the semester will begin with the Italian Renaissance and expand to include Mannerism, the Venetian School, the Northern Renaissance in France and Germany, and the Baroque in France, Germany, Italy, Holland, and Spain.

ART 333C: Mixed Media Installation
This course takes a mixed/multi media, thematic approach to art making in which students explore the various possibilities of installation art as a vital contemporary art form. Critical readings, field trips and artists' talks will provide various examples for exploring this genre while studio projects emphasize the development of content.  Prerequisites of any 200 level studio art course or permission of the instructor.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 200: Introduction to Asian Studies
This colloquium course, required of every Asian Studies major and minor, introduces the academic discipline of Asian Studies.  Through modules taught by four faculty members from across the multidisciplinary spectrum, students will acquire an interdisciplinary understanding of Asia's enduring traditions, modern transformations, and recent emergence as a central player in global affairs.  

BIOLOGY

BIOL 373J: Biological Illustration
This course is a hands-on introduction to biological illustration theory and techniques. The class meets weekly. In the first five weeks students are introduced to some of the basic techniques of biological illustration. Students will be encouraged to work with techniques that fit well with their main interest area(s) in biology. Then, students will be required to apply this knowledge by designing and completing an independent project. This project will involve preparing a set of materials that illustrate a concept or topic of interest, and that can be used to help others understand the topic. Each student will be asked to work on an independent project that incorporates their illustrations in a real setting, whether preparing a poster for a research presentation, teaching a lesson, preparing a resource that others could use to teach a lesson, preparing an educational brochure for the Arboretum or a nature center, preparing posters for an elementary school science class, or other similar project. A student who successfully completes this course should have a basic understanding of the techniques and purposes of biological illustration and be able to use his or her knowledge to successfully convey significant biological information to a target audience.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 325: Topics in Organic Chemistry
Have you ever wondered how a solar cell works, what a light-emitting diode is or how something can be superconducting? This course will explore the structure-property relationships in these and other interesting and useful solids. Additional emphasis will be on the synthesis, characterization, theory and practical applications of these materials.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 384A: New Media Apps & Analysis
This course will focus on several objectives that distinguish it from the online communication new media literacy course taught in spring 2012, including: understanding effective communication theory and practice in relation to a variety of new media and new media applications; becoming more familiar with new media tools for personal, interpersonal, and organizational use; understanding and applying effective communication theory and practices related to new media; and understanding and applying various methods of measuring successful new media communication.  Students enrolled in this class will have an opportunity to evaluate individual's, organizations', and businesses' new media use and design their own new media project for an organization.

COMM 384B: Rhetoric & Popular Music
This course assumes that we use music as a soundtrack for our lives, to encode memories, to express the way we feel, to annoy or influence others.  So we will not study the history of popular music nor will we practice its appreciation; rather, we will study the rhetoric of popular music, or how people use music to do stuff.  In particular, we will explore how music helps people shape and maintain their identities.

COMM 386: Studies in Film: An Epistemology of Romance & Marriage in Films
Cross-listed with ENGL 386
As short definition of epistemology:  the study of how we know what we know.  Thus this course asks us what we know about romance and marriage and what we have learned to think about these subjects from watching movies.  The central theoretical texts will be Stanley Cavell's Pursuits of Happiness: the Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage, Walter Benjamin's essay, "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," and Theodore Adorno and Max Horkheimer, "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception." We will view films which Cavell calls "the comedies of remarriage;" among them are such classics as The Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday, The Lady Eve, It Happened One Night and Adam's Rib.  We will also view Woody Allen's great trilogy:  Manhattan, Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters.  Other films will include Pedro Almadovar's Women on the Verge of Nervous Breakdown, Michael Gondry's The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Marlene Gorris' Antonia's Line.  In addition to viewing films, we will also read works of fiction and poetry that will serve as counterpoints to the films.  Some of these works will be chosen from the following titles: Tillie Olsen's "Tell Me a Riddle," Grace Paley's The Little Disturbances of Man, and poetry by Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton.  Other theoretical readings will be chosen at a later date.  Our goal will be to think critically and theoretically about the ways our culture envisions, describes, creates and mythologizes the roles we play in relationship, romance, love and marriage.  Requirements will include several short writing assignments, discussion assignments and a longer term project.  A film viewing lab will also be required.

COMM-387B: Rhetoric of Human Rights:  National Traditions, Global Perspectives
Human rights have been called the dominant moral vocabulary in today's global politics.  Indeed, since the end of the Cold War, human rights have served as a rallying cry to countless international campaigns and domestic reforms, while inspiring a startling array of academic studies.  This course seeks to understand human rights from a rhetorical perspective by exploring the power of human rights as an instrument of political persuasion.  The first half of the course examines the history of human rights as unique form of political appeal.  Through careful attention to primary documents, students will study the origins of the human rights idiom in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century British and American politics; the development of human rights as a touchstone of antislavery politics and women's rights during the mid-nineteenth century; and the rise of an explicitly international vision of human rights during the World War Two era.  The second half of this course examines contemporary challenges to global human rights; the topics covered include genocide, terrorism, and gender equality.  Students will write a term paper in which they examine a human rights issue of their own choosing.  This course will also require students to conduct original research on primary documents, integrate rhetorical and other contemporary scholarship, and deliver an in-class presentation on selected course readings.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 332: Data Driven Intelligence
The interdisciplinary field of data mining emerged in the early 1900s as a response to the profusion of digital data emerging from numerous applications areas such as biology, chemistry, astronomy, advertising, banking and finance, retail market, stock market, and the WWW, just to name a few. The nature of this field is entirely interdisciplinary attracting experts, researchers and interested audiences from computer science, database systems, artificial intelligence, biology, agriculture, business, mathematics, statistics, and what have you, with the ultimate aim of extracting useful hidden nuggets of knowledge that could aid in decision-making processes and which would have remained unknown otherwise. Operating over huge volumes of data is an intrinsic idiosyncrasy of this young vibrant field.

This course focuses on the four pillars of the field, namely, association rule mining, classification, clustering and outlier analysis. Students will learn state-of-the-art algorithms in these areas, understand the theory behind them, and observe their applications on real-life data sets drawn from numerous application areas. Students will also be exposed to related ideas from artificial intelligence/machine learning as well as useful high-performance computing tools to aid in data processing. As a field still in its infancy, new topics in data-driven intelligence emerge almost daily. Consequently, students will acquire familiarity with reading and understanding new and advanced topics in data-driven intelligence and attempt to analyze and cope with their idiosyncrasies. Students will culminate their work in this course by completing a group research project.

COURSES OF THE COLLEGE

COLG 105I: Reading Group:  St. Cloud Somali Community
We will discuss the book, New Beginnings, which is a series of interviews of members of the St.  Cloud Somali community about their experiences in Somalia and as refugees in the St.  Cloud community.  The book is edited by Sr.  MaryJane Berger and the interviews were conducted by her students in 2004.  We will read the stories and look at the St.
Cloud Somali community today as well.

COLG 105J: Reading Group:  Muslim Journeys
This is a reading course offered as an option to CSB/SJU student participants in the Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys reading and discussion program being offered in spring 2014. We will read and discuss five books from the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf "Connected Histories" theme:

  • When Asia Was the World: Traveling Merchants, Scholars, Warriors, and Monks who Created the "Riches of the East" (Stewart Gordon)
  • The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance (Jim Al-Khalili
  • The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain (María Rosa Menocal)
  • Leo Africanus (Amin Maalouf)
  • In an Antique Land (Amitav Ghosh)

We will discuss the five "Connected Histories" books in concert with supplemental readings, film clips, and guest presentations from the local Muslim community. Students will be active participants in the discussion of the books, and will write a short response paper to each book and a final reflection paper on what they have learned about Islamic history and the Muslim world through these books.

COLG 130: EMT Basics
This course provides students with the skills and knowledge to become certified and to provide basic care of patients in a variety of emergency situations. It provides the basic concepts needed to function as an entry-level provider in an ambulance or pre-hospital environment. Students must be at least 18 years old to take the National and State Certification exams. Admission to this class is based upon an application/interview process.
FEE: $470

ECONOMICS

ECON 359G: International Finance Theory & Policy
International finance as a field of economics arises because of special problems associated with the economic interaction between sovereign states. This course will introduce the main concepts and theories of international finance and illustrate them with real world applications.  Students will be equipped with tools and methods to study and analyze international economic issues and problems. The course addresses a wide range of issues, including the balance of payments, exchange rate determination, international policy coordination, economic integration and monetary unification and international investment and banking (international capital markets)

ENGLISH

ENGL 120A: Reading Fiction & Poetry: Science Fiction: Of Aliens & Outer Space
Science Fiction asks fundamental questions: Who are we? Are we alone? What does it mean to be human? This course explores such questions through both written and video texts. After examining and defining the genre and its fit into the literary cannon, we read short stories, excerpts from longer works, and novels that exemplify two or three specific narrower themes within the field. Each theme is explored through stories presented chronologically to highlight development of scientific and moral thinking over time and is complemented by the application of excerpts from appropriate critical texts. Students (working in small groups) select and present movies and television episodes that further develop the target themes.
NOTE: On most even Thursdays, the course meets at SJU from 2:40 to 5:00 PM to accommodate videos. No prerequisites.

ENGL 120F: Monstrosity/Metamorphosis
Monsters are an integral part of our narrative experience, from childhood ghost stories to updated contemporary tales of vampires and zombies.  We are fascinated with monsters, the creatures that are almost us but not quite, the creatures we might become.  The word monster comes from the Latin monere, meaning "to show," "to warn, or "to remind" (Webster's Word Histories, 1989).  This course will examine literary representations of the monstrous.  We will ask:  How do we conceive of the monster and the monstrous?  What forms can the monstrous take?  What is the relationship between monsters and desire?  What does monstrosity teach us about narrative forms?  And above all, what does the monster reveal or show us about ourselves, especially how we understand and construct individual and social identity?

ENGL 120H: City Mysteries
In many ways, modern fiction is both product and producer of the modern city.  Our urban areas are spaces of technological achievement, intellectual enlightenment, and logical, narrative order.  They are also places of heterogeneity, desire, and mystery.  This class uses the intersection of fiction and the city to explore the nature of fiction, its formal construction, and its interpretation.  We will read classic and contemporary mysteries featuring cities by writers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Diane Liang and study the development of the mystery genre across time periods and cultural contexts.  We will also examine works, such as Mohsin Hamid's Reluctant Fundamentalistand Alejo Carpentier's The Chase, that use the mysteriousness of the city to pose fundamental questions about human knowledge, identity, and social order. 

ENGL 221B: Early Western Literature: Homer to Dante
Why study the classics? A short answer might be: these authors are everywhere. In political discourses and in psychology, in film, in painting and in literature, we continue to speak in terms of their masterpieces. This course will take us into the heart of their great works. The personalities of these authors leap off of the page; their characters are audacious, unlikable, heart-rending, hilarious, and conflicted. These poets-Ovid, Homer, and Virgil-write about gods and men, exploring themes of love, of violence and change, and of causes and consequences. By the medieval period, these classical writers have become "pagans," and writers who value them greatly, such as Dante and Chaucer, struggle at personal risk to protect and to newly translate their books. Our reading will look carefully at how these writers construct genders-both masculine and feminine-normative sexualities, and how issues of power change over time. We will notice how deeply these authors are in dialogue with one another, and how they continue to generate responses in contemporary poetry. Reading ancient and contemporary respondents-including Sappho, Christine de Pizan, and W. H. Auden, and Eavon Boland-students will notice their influence and also gain familiarity with reading such allusions in other work. Students in this course may expect to encounter some of the brilliant minds who have shaped the course of western thought and struck deeply into the human imagination.

ENGL 221C: World Literature: Voltaire/Nabakov
In this course we will read some Masterworks of Western literature and drama in translation from the Early Modern period to the present day.  Our reading list includes some very famous texts, and other equally fascinating reads that may be less familiar to you.  Our texts come from Europe, Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil and may include:  Voltaire's Candide, Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Machado de Assis' The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Chekov's Uncle Vanya, Kafka's The Trial, Freud's Civilization and its Discontents, Camus' The Plague, De Beauvoir's The Second Sex, Rulfo's Pédro Páramo, García Márquez' Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Lispector's Hour of the Star, and Calvino's Once upon a winter's night a traveler.

ENGL 223C: Revolutionary Americas
"How is it," the English writer Samuel Johnson asked in 1775, "that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty from the drivers of Negroes?"  Johnson's stinging question reveals that the struggles for political independence in the Americas at the end of the eighteenth century were inextricably intertwined with the existence and expansion of chattel slavery. This course introduces students to the discourses and intersecting cultural production of forms of freedom and unfreedom-particularly gender inequality, slavery, and racism-in North America and the Caribbean.  We will examine how discourses of race, masculinity, and femininity shape ideas of liberty in the United States, Haiti, and the British West Indies.  We will then trace the repercussions of these discourses through the British abolition of slavery in 1833 in to the end of chattel slavery in the United States during the Civil War.  Our discussions will focus on the messy and incomplete processes of social and personal transformation using a wide range of readings, from Thomas Jefferson's rough draft of the Declaration of Independence and the Haitian Constitution of 1804 to fictional works that shed light on the revolutionary roads not taken, such as Leonora Sansay's Secret History (1808) of the Haitian Revolution and Herman Melville's "Benito Cereno" (1855).

ENGL 313A:  Advanced Poetry Workshop
Are you secretly a poet?  Do you love to write?  This course offers a careful study the art of poetry and the writing life.  Together, we read a wide variety of styles and forms of poetry as we write original poetry throughout the semester.  Students may expect readings to supplement their study of craft, and many writing exercises to engage them with formal and experimental modes of poetry.  Frequent writing workshops provide a lot of feedback on student writing-as well as create opportunities for everyone to exercise reading and editing skills.  As part of the course students meet with visiting writers, participate in a poetry reading, and ultimately design a portfolio of their own poems.  The course primarily aims to develop creative writing skills and to help students grow as writers; additionally though, the course enhances students' ability to read and discuss poetry, expands students' knowledge of poets writing in English, and exposes students to contemporary poetry journals, reading audiences, and new forms of literary publication.

ENGL 315B: Editing & Publishing
"Every generation rewrites the book's epitaph; all that changes is the whodunit."--Leah Price, "Dead Again," New York Times Book Review, August 10, 2012

As e-book sales rise, book publishers are knitting their brows and trying to forecast demand for printed books and e-books. "[L]ast year," Leah Price notes, "Amazon announced it was selling more e-books than print books - hardcover and paperback combined." That announcement prompted a new round of hand-wringing about the future of the book.

The shift from print to electronic formats has had-and continues to have-enormous consequences for the publishing industry. Claims that this shift spells the death of books, however, demand careful examination. In English 315, we'll explore the rapidly changing book-publishing industry, looking closely at the ways in which industry developments and new technologies affect writers, readers, and publishing companies. We'll begin by studying the traditional book-publishing model, and then we'll study the effects of digital technologies on the transmission of writers' works to audiences of readers. Guest speakers from the publishing industry will join us to offer insiders' views.

ENGL 365: Current Issues in Lit Studies: Show Business:  Race and the American Imaginary
What can we make of the stubborn New World habit of giving symbolic power to black populations while simultaneously denying them real social power?  Why are whites so often comfortable "at play" in black cultural forms?  Our primary texts will be novels from the U.S., mostly from the second half of the 19th Century; we will also consider other fine arts forms such as minstrelsy, classical music, jazz, painting, and photography, as well as writings from Economics, New Musicology, Literary Theory, and Cultural Studies.  Since this is a seminar, students will take central responsibility for their learning: expect a vigorous reading load, a substantive seminar presentation, and a research paper.  We begin with Eric Lott's Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class.  Novels may include: Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn (1884), James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man(1912), and William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! (1936).  Music may include works of Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Scott Joplin, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, The American Songbook, and Charlie Parker. 

ENGL 365: Current Issues in Lit Studies:  Milton
As a poet and essayist, Milton has had a tremendous impact on the arts, politics and culture of succeeding generations.  From the writing of American revolutionaries such as Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, to the poetry of William Blake and William Wordsworth, and to Philip Pullman's recent trilogy of novels-His Dark Materials-Milton has provided a template for thinking about innocence, knowledge, sex, liberty of thought, and humankind's relationship to God.

In this course we will read all of the major poems, from early masterworks such as "Lycidas," and Comus, to the epic Paradise Lost, and the late mini-epics: Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes.  Prose works may include the famous defense of the liberty of the press-Areopagitica-as well as excerpts from his wildly (even dangerously)
controversial The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, and The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates.  We will consider these works in the context of Milton's desire to become an English Vergil, his role as a republican supporter in the English Civil War, his justifications for the execution of King Charles I, his work for the interregnum government of Oliver Cromwell, and his final, extraordinarily productive years as a blind poet who only barely escaped execution under the Restoration of King Charles II.  By the end of the semester we will hope to have a rich understanding of the work and life of one of England's most famous and influential poets.

ENGL 381: Literature by Women
This course is designed to introduce students to the diversity of women's writings from Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. Mainly through novels, but supplemented by poetry, essays and memoirs, we will explore the ways in which women writers have articulated their concerns, challenged or re-inscribed societal and familial roles, responded to political and cultural pressures, and formulated a literary and feminist aesthetic.

A major objective of the course is to examine some of the central issues in the field of gender/women's studies: the socio-cultural construction of femininity and masculinity; the meanings and practices of hegemonic patriarchy; the politics and economics of gender relations/identities.

Some of the writers we will read are Nawal El-Saadawi (Egypt), Huda Barakat (Lebanon), Alia Mamoudi (Iraq), Majane Satrapi (Iran), Sahar Khalifeh (Palestine), and Kamila Shamsie (Pakistan).
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.

ENGL 386-01A: Studies in Film: An Epistemology of Romance & Marriage in Films
Cross-listed with COMM 386
As short definition of epistemology:  the study of how we know what we know.  Thus this course asks us what we know about romance and marriage and what we have learned to think about these subjects from watching movies.  The central theoretical texts will be Stanley Cavell's Pursuits of Happiness: the Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage, Walter Benjamin's essay, "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," and Theodore Adorno and Max Horkheimer, "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception." We will view films which Cavell calls "the comedies of remarriage;" among them are such classics as The Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday, The Lady Eve, It Happened One Night and Adam's Rib.  We will also view Woody Allen's great trilogy:  Manhattan, Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters.  Other films will include Pedro Almadovar's Women on the Verge of Nervous Breakdown, Michael Gondry's The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Marlene Gorris' Antonia's Line.  In addition to viewing films, we will also read works of fiction and poetry that will serve as counterpoints to the films.  Some of these works will be chosen from the following titles: Tillie Olsen's "Tell Me a Riddle," Grace Paley's The Little Disturbances of Man, and poetry by Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton.  Other theoretical readings will be chosen at a later date.  Our goal will be to think critically and theoretically about the ways our culture envisions, describes, creates and mythologizes the roles we play in relationship, romance, love and marriage.  Requirements will include several short writing assignments, discussion assignments and a longer term project.  A film viewing lab will also be required.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVR 200A: Environmental Art & Architecture
Cross-listed with ART 200
This course focuses on a range of issues addressing art, architecture and their relationship to a sustainable environment. Through an analysis of critical theory, students will gain an understanding of the language and critical issues of art, architecture and their impact upon the environment. Through a hands-on approach, students will apply these concepts to make ceramic artwork in the SJU Pottery studio. Students will critically analyze readings, discuss examples of art and architecture and meet with artists in order to expand their understanding of the relationship between art, architecture and the environment.
GRADING: A-F only
FEE: $50

ENVR 215: Sustainability Workshop: Edible Gardens
In this course we examine edible gardens from the Victory Gardens during WWII to the growing popularity of school yard garden, urban gardens, and greenhouse gardens through a variety of readings and activities,  We explore the connection of these gardens to the local food movement, to food deserts, to community development, to health issues and to food needs. In addition, we analyze their limitations, including, for example, costs, locations, ordinances and management.  Students research, design and/or implement a sustainable edible garden. Field trips to local gardens will provide examples of theory in practice.

ENVR 300K: God & Nature
This course surveys the relationships between Western religions and the natural world. The course traces the historical development of how nature has been perceived, beginning with Jewish and Christian origins, proceeding through the Middle ages and into modernity, giving special attention to the interactions between Christianity and other faiths (e.g., pre-Christian European traditions and Native American spiritualities). The primary focus of the course concerns contemporary issues within the United States, including religious environmentalism within church bodies and the non-profit sector, forms of spirituality within environmentalism, eco-feminism, the environmental justice movement, nature religions, and contested depictions of the natural world within Christianity.

ENVR 300N: Conservation & Natural Resource Management
The course focuses on the management of natural resources, conflicts over natural resources, and basic problems in natural resource policy-making.  It explores the legal, administrative, and political dimensions of natural resource management problems in various sectors including soil, public rangelands, forests, water, national parks, biodiversity, and recreation.  It also considers the role of environmental ideas, organizations, and civil society in pursuing a variety of conservation and management strategies.

ETHICS

ETHS 390-01A:  Environmental Ethics
Gerhard Zecha
This course investigates a variety of ethical issues that arise from consideration of the relation between humans and the non-human natural world (i.e., the environment, animals, land, ecosystems, wilderness areas).  This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of environmental ethics, to specific ethical issues associated with environmental policy, and to philosophical theorizing about the environment.

ETHS 390-02A: Environmental Ethics
Gerhard Zecha
This course investigates a variety of ethical issues that arise from consideration of the relation between humans and the non-human natural world (i.e., the environment, animals, land, ecosystems, wilderness areas). This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of environmental ethics, to specific ethical issues associated with environmental policy, and to philosophical theorizing about the environment.

ETHS 390-03A: Sympathy & the Invisible Hand: Ethics & Economics in Adam Smith & David Hume
Henrik Bohlin
This course will address some of the foundational issues in ethics and economics and discuss them in comparative perspectives: the foundations of moral thought and behavior in "sympathy" or otherwise, the foundations of economic behavior, the concept of the "invisible hand" and the relevance and role of ethical considerations in economic choices.
By critical comparisons of ethical and economic ideas in Hume, Smith, and modern thinkers, students will deepen their understanding of fundamental concepts and problems in economics and ethics, explore alternative perspectives and theories and arguments for and against them.  This course will provide them with a conceptual and theoretical framework for critical discussion of economic views in contemporary debate.  Alternative conceptions of the relation between economics and ethics will be discussed comparatively, contrasting Smith's and Hume's economic theories, the role of sympathy in society and economy according to Smith and Hume, and the relation between economic behavior and moral considerations according to Smith, Hume, and selected modern economists and philosophers, such as J.  M.  Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman, Amartya Sen, John Rawls and Robert Nozick.

ETHS 390-04A:  Emigration, Xenophobia and Human Exploitation
Marina Martin
The main focus of this course is the analysis of emigration through the ethical problems it raises and the various forms of social tragedies and moral abuses that come with it in modern society.  Hundreds of immigrants lose their lives when trying to reach their destiny abroad.  Do all people have a right to emigrate?  Is the identity and safety of a given nation threaten by the flow of emigration?  Or should nations adopt John Lennon's dream "Imagine all the people sharing all the world?" 
Students will be exposed to a selection of readings, films and documentaries, together with other art forms (photographic material, murals, paintings) all dealing with moral issues raised by cultural/ethnic differences and problems associated with emigration.

 

ETHS 390-05A: Adoption, Ethics & the Family
Jean Keller
Nearly 6 out of 10 Americans have a personal experience with adoption-meaning that they, a family member, or a close friend were either adopted, adopted a child, or placed a child for adoption (Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute). This widespread and increasingly accepted social practice nonetheless raises a number of ethical questions. Should adoptees have the legal right to access their original birth records, or should such records be sealed, as a way to protect the privacy of birthmothers? Is international adoption a benevolent practice that serves the best interests of children, or an exploitative practice in which privileged (usually white) first world persons selfishly satisfy their desire to have children? Why are so many African American children in foster care and do present day social policies in the U.S. serve the well-being of these children or perpetuate a history of U.S. racism? Should gay and lesbian couples have the legal right to adopt?

This course will address these questions and more. Rather than understanding adoption as "good" or "bad", adoption will be examined as a complex and multifaceted social practice informed by deeply entrenched systems of power, privilege, and disadvantage. Using adoption as our lens, we will investigate some of the legacies of gender inequality, racism, and global inequality and how they structure the modern day family. Adoption will be studied from a range of personal, theoretical, historical, and ethical perspectives, highlighting the voices of adoptees, but also addressing the perspectives of birthmothers, adoptive parents and adoption researchers.

ETHS 390-06A: Food, Sex and the Good Life
David McPherson
All of us belong to one or more families that help form, guide, and constrain our decisions. Using Rest's Model of Moral Behavior as a framework, we will focus on the development of moral persons in the family context and discuss some of the many ethical issues faced by today's families. Decisions about the ethics of allocating family resources (including money, time, energy, etc.)whether or not to marry and parent, care of aging parents, parental rights vs. children's rights, honesty, and raising moral children are some of the issues that will be considered. Stimulated by texts, films/DVD's and actual family dialogue we will identify and analyze family ethical issues. Course requirements include mandatory attendance, participation in class discussion, keeping a journal, and several analytical/reflective papers. A-F grading only.

ETHS 390-07A: Food, Sex and the Good Life
David McPherson
All of us belong to one or more families that help form, guide, and constrain our decisions. Using Rest's Model of Moral Behavior as a framework, we will focus on the development of moral persons in the family context and discuss some of the many ethical issues faced by today's families. Decisions about the ethics of allocating family resources (including money, time, energy, etc.)whether or not to marry and parent, care of aging parents, parental rights vs. children's rights, honesty, and raising moral children are some of the issues that will be considered. Stimulated by texts, films/DVD's and actual family dialogue we will identify and analyze family ethical issues. Course requirements include mandatory attendance, participation in class discussion, keeping a journal, and several analytical/reflective papers. A-F grading only.

ETHS 390-08A: Adoption, Ethics & the Family
Jean Keller
Nearly 6 out of 10 Americans have a personal experience with adoption-meaning that they, a family member, or a close friend were either adopted, adopted a child, or placed a child for adoption (Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute). This widespread and increasingly accepted social practice nonetheless raises a number of ethical questions. Should adoptees have the legal right to access their original birth records, or should such records be sealed, as a way to protect the privacy of birthmothers? Is international adoption a benevolent practice that serves the best interests of children, or an exploitative practice in which privileged (usually white) first world persons selfishly satisfy their desire to have children? Why are so many African American children in foster care and do present day social policies in the U.S. serve the well-being of these children or perpetuate a history of U.S. racism? Should gay and lesbian couples have the legal right to adopt?

This course will address these questions and more. Rather than understanding adoption as "good" or "bad", adoption will be examined as a complex and multifaceted social practice informed by deeply entrenched systems of power, privilege, and disadvantage. Using adoption as our lens, we will investigate some of the legacies of gender inequality, racism, and global inequality and how they structure the modern day family. Adoption will be studied from a range of personal, theoretical, historical, and ethical perspectives, highlighting the voices of adoptees, but also addressing the perspectives of birthmothers, adoptive parents and adoption researchers.

ETHS 390-09A: Business Ethics

Jean Ochu
Is business ethics an oxymoron? If you read newspaper articles that describe corporate misconduct and felonious behavior by corporate executives your conclusion would be yes. We will examine the ethical choices individuals must inevitably make in their business and professional lives. We will examine ethical philosophical concepts that are relevant to resolving moral issues in business. We will identify the moral issues involved in specific problem areas of business and determine the reasoning needed to apply ethical concepts to business decisions. Business ethics has an interdisciplinary character. We will examine issues in politics, sociology, economics, environment, and social justice. This course will be primarily discussion based though the use of case studies and actual moral dilemmas faced by individuals in business. Students should have taken at least one course in accounting, management, or economics and/or have an interest in business

ETHS 390-10A:  Folk Tales & the Foundation of Modern Morality
Andreas Kiryakakis
The study of Folktales is especially well suited for a discussion of ethics because it presents us with a wide variety of issues and moral situations.  It gives us an opportunity to make informed and responsible decisions about a multiplicity of different concerns.  An understanding of the meaning of an individual's life is not something acquired at a particular age.  It is the result of a long development and does not occur fully developed like Athena springing from the Head of Zeus.  It is an ongoing process gained from one's experiences.  To find deeper meaning in life one must be able to rise above the confines of self-centered existence and a believe that one can make a difference in the world. 

One must be able to develop one's inner resources so that emotions and intellect become integrated.  This process of integration is structurally developed in Folk tales.  It mirrors cognitive, psychological, philosophical, social and moral ideas and theories familiar to most of us.  We will use the Folktales of the Grimm Brothers as a resource and concentrate on the following topics: Parenthood; Welfare and charity; Death, Punishment and Executions; The Psychology of Children; The Role and Function of Women and Girls; The Image of Men and Boys; Religion, Superstition and Evil.

ETHS 390-11A:  Business Ethics
Erica Stonestreet

This is an ethics course with a business focus.  We will look at a number of important ethical issues that arise in the business world.  Such issues include corporations' social responsibilities, the rights and responsibilities of employees, the ethics of marketing, environmental responsibility and global issues.  We will also discuss the meaning and value that people find in work.  At the beginning of the course we'll cover several ethical frameworks that contemporary philosophers and ethicists look to for insight in handling particular ethical problems; throughout the course we will discuss whether such frameworks shed light on the particular business ethics issues that we address, and if so, how.

ETHS 390-12A:  Business Ethics
Erica Stonestreet
This is an ethics course with a business focus.  We will look at a number of important ethical issues that arise in the business world.  Such issues include corporations' social responsibilities, the rights and responsibilities of employees, the ethics of marketing, environmental responsibility and global issues.  We will also discuss the meaning and value that people find in work.  At the beginning of the course we'll cover several ethical frameworks that contemporary philosophers and ethicists look to for insight in handling particular ethical problems; throughout the course we will discuss whether such frameworks shed light on the particular business ethics issues that we address, and if so, how.

ETHS 390-13A:  War & Memory
Nicholas Hayes
Our course examines the ethical issues of the conduct and representation of war from the Great War (WWI) to today's "war on terrorism."  Our theme follows that shift of strategy from targeting military casualties to the predominant emphasis on civilian casualties as evident in the case studies of the Vietnam War, WWI, the Holocaust, the Troubles in Ireland, and the wars of genocide in our time - Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the post-Cold War conflicts of Russia, and the "war on terrorism."

ETHS 390-14A:  Finding a Place to Stand
Mathew Callahan
Students in this course will explore a variety of ethical theories in their application to the question of "the other" and the relation to the natural world.  A number of these theories include ethical subjectivism, cultural relativism, natural ethics, utilitarianism and the ethics of virtue.  Students will be expected to bring their own, personal perspective to bear on the various philosophical theories and consider what forces, large and small, shape not only what we think but how we think as well.  Books will include Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies; Tea Obreht's The Tiger's Wife; Edwidge Danticat's Breath, Eyes, Memory; ZZ Packer's Drinking Coffee Elsewhere; Rick Bass' In the Loyal Mountains; Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men; Wendell Berry's Fidelity; Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild; George Saunders' The Braindead Megaphone.  There will also be a number of short articles and in-class lectures related to various ethical theories.

ETHS 390-15A:  Healthcare Ethics
Kathy Twohy
This course directs students to re-think ethics in today's system of healthcare, where the best possibilities for ethical healthcare in this century lie beyond traditional and mainstream thought.  Students will question assumptions guided by the major principles of healthcare ethics and reflect deeply on clinical cases across healthcare disciplines from the perspective of professional and consumer.

ETHS 390-16A:  What do Ethics Mean During a Time of War?
Christi Siver
If General Sherman was right that "war is hell," the concept of ethics seems completely irrelevant.  However, as human society has evolved, numerous politicians, philosophers, and religious figures have agreed on the need for an ethics in war, even if they have not agreed on the content of those ethics.  Students will be introduced to formal ethical frameworks and discover the dilemmas they encounter when applying these frameworks to real world situations.  Students will compare how these ethical frameworks overlap and diverge from political values.  We will debate particular dilemmas in warfare, including which authorities can declare war and when they are justified in doing so, what methods can be used in war, and what obligations both combatants and non-combatants have.  Students will work with a basic ethics text supplemented by contemporary articles outlining modern dilemmas related to ethics of war.

ETHS 390-17A: Locating a Moral Compass
Elizabeth Stoltz
Our American world is full of demands on our lives--materialistic, political, religious, physical, environmental, etc.--yet we have a more important demand we must make of ourselves: how do we go about choosing what behavior will make us into the kind of person we would want to be.  In other words, how do I find a standard for myself for the choices I have to make?  If I try to live a good life, what will I be required to do?  Can I lead a good life for myself or do I need to become responsible to others to be fulfilled?  How will I determine right from wrong, good from bad, virtue from vice?  What does it take to be a moral person?  Does being morally "good" negate my own self interest?  How do I decide which actions are the best for me to choose?  Is every action moral or immoral?  Can I judge the actions of others?  Will being good result in happiness?  Is a good life a happy life?  These are some of the questions you need to consider as you travel along life's path.  They are questions I hope you can start to resolve for yourself, as together, we study and discuss this semester.  We will also consider ethics without a religious framework, or as one of Dostoyevsky's characters asks: "If there is no God, am I free to rape my neighbor?"

ETHS 390-18A: Locating a Moral Compass
Elizabeth Stoltz
Our American world is full of demands on our lives--materialistic, political, religious, physical, environmental, etc.--yet we have a more important demand we must make of ourselves: how do we go about choosing what behavior will make us into the kind of person we would want to be. In other words, how do I find a standard for myself for the choices I have to make? If I try to live a good life, what will I be required to do? Can I lead a good life for myself or do I need to become responsible to others to be fulfilled? How will I determine right from wrong, good from bad, virtue from vice? What does it take to be a moral person? Does being morally "good" negate my own self interest? How do I decide which actions are the best for me to choose? Is every action moral or immoral? Can I judge the actions of others? Will being good result in happiness? Is a good life a happy life? These are some of the questions you need to consider as you travel along life's path. They are questions I hope you can start to resolve for yourself, as together, we study and discuss this semester. We will also consider ethics without a religious framework, or as one of Dostoyevsky's characters asks: "If there is no God, am I free to rape my neighbor?"

HONR 390: Reading for Life
Anthony Cunningham
Everyone loves a good story. Great stories can provide us with far more than mere recreation. Stories can provide us with rich character portraits that can reveal the subtleties and nuances of what it means to live well and responsibly. In this course we'll use novels and films to address Socrates' most basic ethical questions, "How should one live?" and "What sort of person should I be?" We'll do so by attending to all the concrete, particular details of real life and fictional characters thoroughly embroiled in the "business of living." Reading well offers the possibility of vicarious experience and ultimately, ethical insight. Our readings will include The Crucible (Arthur Miller), Ransom (David Malouf), The Remains of the Day (Kazuo Ishiguro), Beloved Toni Morrison), How To Be Good(Nick Hornby), Reading in the Dark (Seamus Deane), and Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston).

HONR 390: Happiness Is...
Rodger Narloch
When people are asked what they want in life, a common response is that they just want to be happy.  But what is happiness and how do we attain it?  In this course, we will discuss a variety of different perspectives on these questions.  We will address what self-focused happiness might look like, but then transition to questions of how an individual's happiness relates to the happiness of others (and which others?).  Furthermore, we will discuss what it means to be morally good and the extent to which being good is a necessary component in being happy.  Finally, we will think about the nature of choices and decision making, especially as they relate to the formation of one's identity and vocation or path in life.  Ultimately, students will have to propose their own educated model or theory of happiness and articulate its implications for how they plan to live their lives.  These topics will be covered through extensive class discussion based on significant amounts of writing in response to readings from philosophical, psychological, as well as Catholic and Benedictine perspectives.

PHIL 321: Moral Philosophy
We will first consider some of the most prominent moral theories in the tradition of western philosophical thought, such as the views of Aristotle, John Stuart Mill and Immanuel Kant. We will analyze their views to see if they provide adequate guides for living a good life. We will then turn to a number of contemporary moral views which claim to offer variations or alternatives to the classical models-such as feminist ethics, virtue ethics, and the use of literary texts to develop moral points of view. Most of our work will be through class discussion of our readings. Our focus throughout will be to consider whether we can find guidance for our own lives in the moral views we will consider.

PHIL 339: Chinese Philosophy
Charles Wright
Students in this course will engage in the close reading and discussion of selected foundational texts in the Chinese Philosophical tradition. One central course theme will be the Confucian emphasis on individual cultivation of virtuous character and the role such character plays in assuring the appropriate utilization of government authority. Another will be the Taoist analysis of the dysfunctional nature of the competitive pursuit of wealth and prestige, accompanied by their provocative argument that a genuinely satisfying life can only be obtained by abandoning such pursuit. The class will begin with psychologist Richard Nisbett's groundbreaking work, The Geography of Thought, which documents how styles of thinking widespread in China, Japan and Korea can be traced back to these traditions of Chinese philosophy. We will also examine political philosopher Daniel Bell's recent book East Meets West: Human Rights and Democracy in East Asia, in which he investigates whether Western democracies might learn something from traditional Chinese social and political thought.

GENDER & WOMEN'S STUDIES

GEND 290H:  Men, Women, and the Environment
This course will examine the relationships between men, women, and the environment through the lens of ecofeminism. It will explore how patriarchal norms have devalued women and nature, resulting in the denigration and oppression of both. Students will look at potential links between the domination of women by men and of the natural world by humans, as well as the ways in which environmental problems specifically affect women. Some of the issues that will be covered include food production, climate change, water, toxins, and globalization.

HISPANIC STUDIES

HISP 354A: Bilingualism in Schools & Society:  Language, Identity & Policy
Who is bilingual? How is bilingualism evidenced in schools and society in a globalized world? What are the politics behind people's language choices in a bilingual community? What are the social and conversational attributes of Spanglish? This course is designed to raise awareness of the complexities and benefits of bilingualism through the study of Spanish/ English bilingualism in the US. Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English,
PREREQUISITE:   HISP 312

HISP 355F:  U.S. Latino Literature
This course offers an opportunity to explore Latino/a literature, introducing the major trends in the field and placing the literature within a historical, social and cultural framework.  Emphasis will be on similarities and differences of these narratives among different Latino groups in the US.  Topics to be discussed include the transformation of Identity, bilingualism and Spanglish, the experiences of the exile, the immigrant, the refugee, the current laws of immigration and the relationship of Latinos to their place of origin and their new communities in the United States.

To engage with this literature you must be willing to allow for new perspectives in a contradictory globalized world that embraces and rejects at the same time cultural differences and peoples of the so called developing world.

HISP 356A: Seminar: Hispanic Culture: Identity and globalization in Columbia, Chile and Spain
Chile, Colombia and Spain are known for their rich cultural production as well as for violent internal struggles to define what it means to be Chilean, Colombian or Spanish.  Today the forces of global communication and transnational economics are again challenging and reshaping ideas of Chilean-ness, Colombian-ness and Spanish-ness.  In this course we will study film and fiction that explore the limits of national identity in the age of globalization, paying particular attention to life and culture of Chile since the 1973 military coup, Colombia in the age of global narco-trafficking and Spain since the return of democracy.

HISP 360C: Poetic Connections:  Spanish Language Poetry Workshop
Inspired by activist and socially engaged poetry, this course will be conducted as a collaborative poetry workshop. We will read poems by established names that may include Julia Esquivel (Guatemala), Ernesto Cardenal (Nicaragua), Juan Gelman (Argentina) and Pablo Neruda (Chile). We will also read and listen to poetic voices that emerge from unexpected places to name what has been silenced. By writing our own poems in Spanish, we will explore poetry as a means to claim our voices. The course will be divided between study of published Latin American poems and the development of our own poetic voices and writing practices. We will read, write and critique poems as a means of articulating our connections to the world we inhabit. Poets and non-poets, shy people and extroverts are all invited to become active participants in the making of a Spanish language collaborative poetry workshop.  "Poetry names what has been silenced and allows us to understand and articulate our connections to one another and to the world we inhabit" (June Jordan, Poetry for the People, 17).

HISTORY

HIST 200: Sophomore Colloquium:  Germany from Weimer to the Third Reich, 1919-1945
History Colloquium has several goals for students: to understand history as interpretation, to learn to analyze and interpret primary sources, to make and assess historical arguments, and to solidify their identity as historians.

This course will focus on Germany during the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich, two vastly different societies.  After World War I, Germans faced questions about national identity, economic crisis, political revolution, utopian ideas about the future, sex, racial policy, war, genocide, and more.  Should we support the Bolsheviks and spread revolution to Germany?  Why are women voting and holding public office now? Can I borrow your sex manual? Aren't you afraid "modernity" will destroy the German people?  Why doesn't everyone like the Nuremberg party rally as much as I do?  Why do my neighbors exclude me just because I am Jewish? Why is there a satellite concentration camp in my town?  What is really happening on the Eastern Front?

The course will include readings on Weimar and the Third Reich, but a substantial proportion of the materials will be primary sources such as novels, oral histories, government documents, art works, film, newspaper articles, and the like.  Students will have many opportunities to become historians using the sources from this fascinating period.

HIST 300A: Atlantic World
This class will provide students with a thematic introduction to Atlantic history, one of the most exciting fields of recent historical scholarship. Historian J.H. Elliott defines Atlantic history as the study "of the creation, destruction and re-creation of communities as a result of the movement, across and around the Atlantic basin, of people, commodities, cultural practices, and ideas" between the late-fifteenth and mid-nineteenth centuries. We will begin by exploring the methodology of Atlantic historians and conclude by reflecting on the use of the "Atlantic World" as a historical concept. In between, we will study the meetings and migrations of Europeans, indigenous Americans, and West Africans; trans-Atlantic exchanges of commodities such as chocolate, tobacco, and sugar; competitions for land, labor, souls, and wealth; how slave traders tried to transform captured Africans into slaves; how enslaved people asserted their humanity; and, lastly, revolutionary upheavals. While learning the histories of the Atlantic World, students will have opportunities to strengthen their analytical reading, critical thinking, argumentative writing, and public speaking.

HIST 300N: Latin American Migrations
Mexican immigration to the United States is today a familiar issue in discussions of U.S. society and politics. The topic of "Latin American migrations," however, involves much more than this singular migration pattern. Prior to the 20th century, immigration to Latin America was far more important than emigration from Latin America and included processes of colonization, the slave trade, and "whitening" initiatives. Moreover, throughout all time periods of Latin American history, the number of individuals participating in internal migrations, such as movement from country to city, has vastly out-scaled the number of international migrants. As such, this course examines migration to, from, and within Latin America and the Caribbean from the period of initial European colonization to the present. While contemporary immigration to the United States is an important part of this narrative, the course approaches migration from global and comparative perspectives rather than focusing on the immigration history of any one particular nation. Two points of comparison, in particular, will be central. First, we will compare and contrast the migration histories of different regions and nations within Latin America and the Caribbean. Secondly, we will identify connections between historical and modern-day migrations. In so doing, students will gain a better understanding of the processes and patterns of migration, the various causes for migration, the complexities of immigrant incorporation, and state monitoring of migration.

HIST 300O: Gender in U.S. History
This course will examine how gender and changing attitudes toward sexual behaviors have influenced U.S. history. Using gender as a tool of analysis, we will explore how gender and sexuality have influenced Americans' personal identities and interactions with others. Historically, in what ways have Americans defined what it means to be a "man" or a "woman"? How do those definitions and supposed "natural" characteristics influence one's opportunities or limitations in life and their status within the nation? Furthermore, how do those ideals differ by race, class, religion, region, education, and other cultural and social markers? In this course we will explore the varied meanings of "masculinity" and "femininity" from the American Revolution to the present day, and how those meanings have changed based on the needs or anxieties of the time-even for events and issues which seem to have little to do with gender or sexuality.

One goal of the course is to help you think critically about documents and other sources you encounter in this class and in daily life: who produced it, what assumptions about gender or public/private life does the author make, and how those assumptions influence one's understanding of cultural identities. Primary source readings are intended to help you understand the people of the past on their own terms. Additionally, you will read the works of historians and other scholars who place gender at the center of their inquiry.

HIST 381: Readings Seminar: Asia and Empire
While academics and pundits debate if the 21st Century will be the Asian Century -- due to the rise of the economic, military, and political power of India and China, it is important to understand the historical roots that both helped and hindered the rise of Asian countries. During the later 18th century through the early 20th century, European nations were the rising economic, military, and political powers and Europeans used this influence to assert direct colonial control and indirect influence on various Asian societies. Although research historically has often centered on the rhetoric and actions of the colonizers, contemporary historical works have also emphasized how different Asian societies and individuals responded in a variety of ways to European influence -- as collaborators, resistors, and nationalists. We will explore these perspectives through a variety of books in the field that highlight topics such as nationalism, subaltern studies, and gender.

As we explore the history of colonialism and nationalism in Asia, we will read recent historical monographs as well as 'classics' in the field that exemplify different approaches and methods of historical analysis. We will evaluate the methodology, arguments, and evidence of each monograph in order to develop critical historical skills through detailed seminar discussions and a series of essays. Learning how to "read a history book" is an important and rewarding skill to master, and we will discuss and analyze engaging topics in modern Asian history as we develop that skill.

HIST 395: Historiography and Methods: Interpreting Northern Ireland
In this course we'll investigate how historians have interpreted the history of Northern Ireland, mapping changes in interpretation over time and analyzing them within the context of their creation.  We'll also explore how Northern Irish history has been represented in public spaces and popular culture. By studying the historiography and public history of this complex, conflicted, beautiful, baffling place, we will gain insight into other places that have been shaped by similar histories. Students also will gain a better understanding of methods and theories through which scholars construct interpretations of the past.

In the last part of the semester, students will apply course skills and insights to the conceptualization, research and writing of a substantial historiographical essay on a topic of their choice. As the essay is meant to help students build a foundation for their senior thesis projects, they will have wide latitude in choosing their topics.

Students will build skills in critical reading, comparative analysis, and historiographical synthesis. In addition to the final essay, course work will include reading analysis papers and lively class discussions. We'll also experiment with using some very cool digital tools for data visualization and research project management.

HONORS

HONR 240A: The Biblical Tradition
An introduction to the discipline of Christian theology with a substantial focus on select themes and texts of the scriptures, such as creation, covenant, kingdom, prophets, gospel and New Testament letters. Attention is also given to the method of theological study and the development of the Christian tradition since Biblical times. Students will be introduced to the Biblical languages, especially Hebrew, and will learn to think critically both about the Bible and about modern theological controversies.

HONR 250C: Great Issues in Philosophy
This writing intensive course introduces you to philosophy through the examination of some of philosophy's biggest questions.  The course may include the following topics: the relationship between the mind and body, personal identity, morality, free will, and the nature of knowledge.  In respective order, these are some of the questions which fall under each topic.  Is the mind an immaterial soul or is it identical to the brain?  What makes it possible that you are the same person now as you were ten years ago, given that all sorts of facts about you have changed?  What makes an action right or wrong, or a person good or bad?  What does it mean to act freely?  What are the reasons for thinking that we actually aren't free agents?  What is knowledge and do we have any?  In particular, do we have knowledge of the external world or is it possible that we're in some Matrix-like scenario? 

HONR 270C: Problem Solving
An introduction to solving complex problems in interdisciplinary topics which will be drawn from mathematics, computer science, and physics. Students will work in groups and present their results.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 119 and admission to MAPCORES program or consent in instructor.

HONR 311: Great Books/Great Ideas
This is a year-long discussion based seminar that concentrates on some of the world's greatest works of literature, philosophy, and intellectual history. Authors may include Augustine, Euripides, Austen, Thoreau, Biblical writers, Camus, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Eliot, Faulkner, Pynchon, Freud, Homer, Kafka, Flaubert, Melville, Dinesen, Flannery O'Connor, Plato, Nabokov, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Virginia Woolf, and others. Preference will be given to Junior and Senior honors students who will complete the entire year. Registration is by permission of the instructor only. All students in this course purchase a personal library consisting of roughly 100 books, and students are required to read a number of works during the summer.'

HONR 320: Security: Defense, Diplomacy and Development
In this course, students will explore issues of international security from different perspectives. The course will start by looking at traditional security issues involving violence and warfare, but then move on to economic security, environmental security, and human security. Students will examine the role of states, international institutions, and non-governmental actors in seeking to understand and increase security.

HONR 340K: Great Books in World Religions
This class will examine sacred texts from several of the world's primary religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism).  Each sacred text will be paired with a secondary text showing how the religion's precepts are lived out in one particular historical and cultural context.  The focus of the class will be on the texts themselves-what they teach about the human condition and how they function as sacred texts, in other words, what it means to be a "people of the book."  We will discuss how each religion started with an experience of the numinous and used lenses shaped by their particular historical and cultural context to explain that experience and its implications for how to live. Texts will include Job, excerpts from the Talmud and the Qur'an, the Bhagavad Gita, Zen poems and koans, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as works by Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Luther, Wiesel, Rumi, Patanjali, Hesse, and Endo.  The format will be a seminar, modeled after the Honors Great Books class.

HONR 350:  Jane Austen & Charles Dickens:  Social Criticism
The latest wave of films and fan fiction demonstrates the continuing appeal of Jane Austen's ironic, witty novels.  Elizabeth Bennett, Emma Woodhouse, Elinor Dashwood, and Austen's other heroines serve as vehicles and as targets for biting satire of social conventions, especially the conventions surrounding money, marriage, and manners.  In the first half of this course, we'll examine Austen's keenly ironic treatment of these and other matters in Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, and Persuasion.

Jane Austen once described her writing as "the little bit (two Inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush, as produces little effect after much labour."  The nib of Charles Dickens' pen dashed across voluminous sheets, sketching a vast range of family situations and social institutions.  In the second half of the course, we'll turn our attention to Dickens' powerful critiques of Victorian society.  We'll read David Copperfield, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend.

HONR 370B: Research Seminar
Solving complex problems in interdisciplinary topics which will be drawn from mathematics, computer science, and physics. Students will work in groups and present their results.
PREREQUISITE: HONR 270 and admission to MAPCORES program or consent of instructor.

HONR 390: Ethics Common Seminar: Reading for Life
Anthony Cunningham
Everyone loves a good story. Great stories can provide us with far more than mere recreation. Stories can provide us with rich character portraits that can reveal the subtleties and nuances of what it means to live well and responsibly. In this course we'll use novels and films to address Socrates' most basic ethical questions, "How should one live?" and "What sort of person should I be?" We'll do so by attending to all the concrete, particular details of real life and fictional characters thoroughly embroiled in the "business of living." Reading well offers the possibility of vicarious experience and ultimately, ethical insight. Our readings will include The Crucible (Arthur Miller), Ransom (David Malouf), The Remains of the Day (Kazuo Ishiguro), Beloved (Toni Morrison), How To Be Good(Nick Hornby), Reading in the Dark (Seamus Deane), and Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston).

HONR 390: Happiness Is...
Rodger Narloch
When people are asked what they want in life, a common response is that they just want to be happy.  But what is happiness and how do we attain it?  In this course, we will discuss a variety of different perspectives on these questions.  We will address what self-focused happiness might look like, but then transition to questions of how an individual's happiness relates to the happiness of others (and which others?).  Furthermore, we will discuss what it means to be morally good and the extent to which being good is a necessary component in being happy.  Finally, we will think about the nature of choices and decision making, especially as they relate to the formation of one's identity and vocation or path in life.  Ultimately, students will have to propose their own educated model or theory of happiness and articulate its implications for how they plan to live their lives.  These topics will be covered through extensive class discussion based on significant amounts of writing in response.

LANGUAGES

FREN 332:  20th-21st Century French Literature
In this course, we explore texts written during a time of vast political and social change. Films help us enter visually into the francophone world as well. Who is writing in French, for whom, and why? What are the geographical, political, literary, social and sexual boundaries of French and Francophone identity, and what is the role of the intellectual and artist? We seek to appreciate the beauty and originality of these works in their cultural context. Readings include Proust, Du côté de chez Swann ; Camus, L'exil et le royaume ; Simone de Beauvoir, Une mort très douce ; Maillet, Par derrière chez mon père. Key themes include absence and presence, exile and belonging, gender empowerment and post-colonial engagement.
PREREQUISITE:  FREN 311 or 315 or 312 or 316 

FREN 355D: Performing in French
In this course, we study French-language works from a variety of genres: songs, spoken word, short plays (from medieval farce to experimental theater of the 20th-21st centuries); we will choose particular pieces to learn and perform for a public audience. Performance venue may vary depending on projects chosen: in class, open mic at O'Conn's, Brother Willie's Pub, other campus stage venues, or even Celebrating Scholarship & Creativity Day or the French Lyric Festival.  ABC mods (class does not meet on Fridays); may require one substantial rehearsal TBA prior to performance. 
PREREQUISITE:  FREN 212 or 311 or 315 or permission of instructor.

GERM 357:  German & Your Career
This course is designed to introduce students to the world of work and careers through the lens of German culture. By engaging in a variety of authentic materials, students will learn to 1) write a variety of business letters, emails and other documents in German for transactions such as ordering, making an offer, advertising a product or a position;  2) write an appropriate resume and job application letter; 3) conduct a job interview in German,  and 3) conduct everyday transactions on the phone and in person.  Students will also create job-related scenarios and act them out with their classmates.  Seminar participants will acquire specialized vocabulary and learn to apply their German skills to two or three subject areas of their own choosing, e.g., music, psychology, global business, chemistry, or any other subject areas. In addition, grammar topics will be covered according to student needs.
PREREQUISITE: GERM 212