CAMPUS ALERT: Due to the weather, all evening classes at CSB and SJU are canceled. The LINK bus will run on its regular schedule until 5 p.m. and then every hour on the hour for the remainder of the evening, weather permitting. Pre-scheduled campus and community events and college/university sponsored events scheduled at off campus locations may continue at the discretion of the divisional VP.

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ART

ART 233D:  Artists Books
Students will develop visual narratives using various 2-D media such as drawing, painting and printmaking processes.  Students will investigate the bookform as a format as they work towards arriving at a marriage of form and content.  The artist book is a unique format that encourages different attitudes between artist and viewer.  It contains ideas in the familiarity and intimacy of the bookform while providing opportunities for development of sequential imagery and narratives.  Students may combine text and image in their projects and will work towards finding the most appropriate bookform for their content.  Visual presentations, demos, field trips, discussion and hands on studio practice are all components of this class.
FEE:  $70

ART 233F:  Printmaking
This is a hands on course working with the following printmaking processes.

  • Monotypes, a created image painted or drawn on a smooth surface and printed, and one of a kind print form.
  • A collagraph, a construction on a plate surface and printed.
  • Relief/Woodcut, a surface cut away and printed

There will be equal importance given to the importance to the creating and printing of images.
FEE:  $45

ART 233L:  Handmade Papermaking
Students will be introduced to the history, methods and science of papermaking via the process of making paper by hand. In particular, students in this course will be taught how to identify and gather old clothes and local plants (from the arboretum) suitable for making paper. They will then learn how to break down the clothes/plants and reform the fibers into a variety of handmade papers suitable for use in writing, drawing, photography and printmaking. The course will include readings on papermaking's thousand-year history and will explore the contemporary uses of handmade paper. Discussion will include the environmental ramifications of using various types of plants and fibers found in the region. No previous art experience necessary.
FEE:  $60

ART 233O:  Documentary Film Production
This special-topic course will focus on the concept and practice of documentary filmmaking. We will examine diverse styles of non-fiction films and learn techniques in the various stages of filmmaking; interview and research, lighting, capturing sound and image, lighting, and editing. Projects assigned in class will address current issues in our community to inform, persuade, and inspire the viewers.
FEE:  $30

 

BIOLOGY

BIOL 373K:  Neurobiology
A reading, writing, and discussion-based investigation of neurobiological principles such as neuronal structure and function, cellular excitability, synaptic transmission, sensory processing, motor responses, and disease.  Students will be expected to produce a critical analysis of a current neurobiological issue of their choice. 
PREREQUISITE:  grade of C or better in BIOL 121 and 221.

 

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 318:  Microscopic Chemical Analysis
A quantum mechanical perspective will be used in the course to explore and explain the behavior of chemical systems in the molecular and atomic scale.    Spectroscopy will be emphasized as the instrumental application that will link the quantum mechanical theory with acquired experimental data.  Statistical methods will be developed for the assessment of instrumentation as well as a fundamental understanding of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques used in the analysis and exploration of chemical properties. 
PREREQUISITE:  CHEM 255;
PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE:  MATH 120; PHYS 106.

CHEM 347  Chemical Biology
Chemical biology will cover topics of current interest in chemical biology and will survey the way in which small molecules are used to investigate and manipulate biological systems either for a biological or chemical purpose. Specific topics may include protein design, development of unnatural biological molecules, peptide-carbohydrate interactions, combinatorial synthesis/libraries, molecular recognition, chemical genetics, biosynthesis and methods of drug discovery.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 251 Recommended: BIOL 121 and CHEM 315

CHEM 348  Molecular Design
Molecular design and catalysis are important applications of chemical reactivity concepts.  In this course, students will learn about some current methods useful in synthesis and see these methods applied in the synthesis of complex molecules. Topics may include organo-transition metal reactions, catalytic methods of enantioselective synthesis and retrosynthetic analysis.  Students will demonstrate basic proficiency in these areas and also carry out detailed analyses of total syntheses from the current literature.
PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE: CHEM 315

CHEM 353  Xenobiotic Metabolism
This course will explore biological mechanisms of activation and detoxification of xenobiotics. Topics will include oxidation/ reduction mechanisms (e.g. Cytochrome P450, Flavin Mono-Oxygenase), transferase reactions (e.g. Glutathione S-Transferase, Glycosyltransferases, Acetyltransferases), adduct formation, and repair mechanisms.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 315 Recommended BIOL 121.

 

COMMUNICATION

COMM 330:  Apology & Crisis Communication
This is a capstone course in rhetoric studying the genres of apology, image repair, and crisis communication.  Students will analyze speeches and statements of apology and self-defense and assess the effectiveness, ethics, and meaning of such appeals in several case studies, from contemporary examples such as athlete Lance Armstrong's admission to using performance-enhancing substances and British Petroleum's discourse following the Gulf oil spill, to historical examples such as Senator Ted Kennedy's statements after the Chappaquiddick accident and President Bill Clinton's speeches during the impeachment scandal.  The course also examines how nation-states utilize apology to address historical wrongdoing.  Students will design a message of apologia, analyze the crisis messages of prominent rhetors, and discuss the importance of apology and reconciliation in society.  In addition to other requirements, students will generate a critical essay for public presentation. 
PREREQUISITE:  JN or SR standing and one of the following courses: COMM 101, 102 or 201.  Registration preference is given to COMM majors, but other interested students may contact the instructor for possible admission.

COMM 381L:  Rhetoric & Popular Music
This course assumes that we use music as a soundtrack for our lives, to encode memories, to express the way we feel, to annoy or influence others.  So we will not study the history of popular music nor will we practice its appreciation; rather, we will study the rhetoric of popular music, or how people use music to do stuff.  In particular, we will explore how music helps people shape and maintain their identities.

COMM 386:  Studies in Film:  It's Film Heaven:  Analyzing Genre Films in an Interpretive Community
Luke Mancuso
Cross-listed with ENGL 386
See description under ENGL 386 

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 217C:  Research Seminar
In this research seminar, students will have the unique opportunity to learn Artificial Intelligence in a modern approach named Intelligent Agents. Seminar readings will introduce students to current theories of agents and multi-agent systems. This course will allow students to develop and advance their own original research interests, and would be an ideal experience for juniors and seniors interested in pursuing graduate studies, as well as for those students interested in learning more about AI and its applications.

CSCI 317F:  Parallel Computing
Presents the theoretical foundations of parallel computing and an overview of several parallel computing models.  Exposes students to current parallel programming models and systems through projects.  Teaches students the ability to determine the most appropriate model for a given task.
PREREQUISITE:  162 or 200 or 230, 310 recommended

CSCI 317G:  Network Programming
This course covers the basic concepts involved in writing programs that can be run using standard TCP/IP networks for displaying data, retrieving data from the network, acting on data from the network, etc. Emphasis will be placed on client-server programs. Generally, the tools will be Java based with use of HTML5 javascripts, JDBC, JSP, and so on. One of the projects will be using the students' knowledge to construct a local Cloud.
PREREQUISITE:  CSCI 230 or CSCI 200.

COURSES OF THE COLLEGE

COLG 105D:  Career Planning
This course is a practical seminar intended to increase student understanding of themselves in relationship to their academic and career goals. The course explores the importance of experiential learning opportunities and the professional preparation required to actively pursue these opportunities. Content includes major and career exploration, career tool (e.g., resume, letters, interviewing) development, and the leveraging of career resources including human networks, technology, and others.

ENGLISH

ENGL 120F:  Monstrosity & Metamophosis in Fiction
Monsters are an integral part of our narrative experience, from childhood ghost stories to updated contemporary tales of vampires and zombies.  We are fascinated with monsters, the creatures that are almost us but not quite, the creatures we might become.

The word monster comes from the Latin monere, meaning "to show," "to warn, or "to remind" (Webster's Word Histories, 1989).  This course will examine literary representations of the monstrous.  We will ask:  How do we conceive of the monster and the monstrous?  What forms can the monstrous take?  What is the relationship between monsters and desire?  What does monstrosity teach us about narrative forms?  And above all, what does the monster reveal or show us about ourselves, especially how we understand and construct individual and social identity?

ENGL 122A:  Myth:  Fiction & Poetry
In this course we will read fiction and poetry written by a variety of modern and contemporary authors who incorporate mythology and/or legends into their writing.  As we begin each piece of fiction or poetry, we will simultaneously read versions of the myths or legends being accessed in the writing; in this way, we can see how the author may be re-imagining and translating the myth into his or her contemporary social, political, and artistic contexts.  Students may expect to read writers from several different cultures and countries, to gain skills and confidence reading both poetry and fiction, and to explore the imaginative and critical dynamics of re-writing myth-both in our course readings and in multiple creative and critical writing exercises that we will undertake throughout the semester.

ENGL 122F:  Modern Irish Literature
This course will both hone and investigate out literary interpretive practices, focusing on some of the most inventive and influential literature to emerge from Ireland in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We'll read both past masters and current practitioners of the literary arts (some in translation), including, W.B. Yates, Elizabeth Bowen, James Joyce, Flann O'Brien, Thomas Kinsella, Seamus Heaney, Evan Boland, Medbh McGuckian, Paul Muldoon, and Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill. Particular emphasis will be placed on the way these and other writers imagine(d) their work in conversation with that of their peers, creating and complicating notions of cultural and artistic identity.

ENGL 213-02A:  Seminar in Creative Writing
Writing has so much to give, so much to teach, so many surprises.  That thing you had to force yourself to do - the actual act of writing - turns out to be the best part.  It's like discovering that while you thought you needed the tea ceremony for the caffeine, what you really needed was the tea ceremony.  The act of writing turns out to be its own reward.

--Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

...in order to write, one must not be lazy, and that is precisely one of the difficulties of writing...because it must span zones of very hard work, with the risks that that entails; the longings and threats of idleness...

--Roland Barthes, "Dare to Be Lazy"

In our Seminar in Creative Writing, we will delve deeply into the act of writing. We will explore poetry and fiction through the reading of published work and the writing (and revising) of poems and stories.  We will discuss language, voice, and form.  We will investigate how poems and stories work. And, most importantly, we will write. A LOT.  The class will include daily writing exercises, discussion of craft and construction, and writing homework, as well as larger creative projects in poetry and fiction.

The class will enable you to participate in a community of writers, situate yourself in a tradition of other writings, and practice the important and exciting art of revision.

Together we will create a space where imagination, play, and exploration through language take precedence in our daily lives and keep us present in the world and in the word.

ENGL 222C:  Shakespeare's Inheritance: English Drama to Shakespeare
New productions of early English drama show their wonderful liveliness, bawdiness, and spectacle.  Alfred Hickling, writing for the UK newspaper, The Guardian, reported on August 7, 2012, about preparations for a cycle of plays tracing biblical stories from the creation to the Last Judgment:

There are some bizarre items on the agenda of today's production meeting at York Theatre Royal.  Topics include "dinosaur topiary" and Pontius Pilate's underwear, while the wardrobe supervisor is anxious to know God's measurements.  "Ineffable and unknowable," someone suggests.  "Very funny," comes the reply.  "But I've got nearly 1,000 costumes to make and I need his inside leg."

No wonder theater companies are eager to produce these plays; roisterous devils*, ranting tyrants, mischievous thieves-and great biblical heroes squabbling with their wives- enliven the scenes of biblical stories.

We'll begin with excerpts from these cycles and then move on to "morality plays" that figure Mankind beset not by devils but by personified Vices, tricky and sly and smart and subtle.

Shakespeare inherited the dramatic legacy of these earlier forms, and we'll investigate the ways in which he uses and adapts them in his own dramatic work.  After reading a sequence of medieval and early Renaissance plays, we'll pay particular attention to the device of the play within the play, first in a work by Thomas Kyd, Shakespeare's contemporary, called The Spanish Tragedy, and then in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Hamlet (and perhaps Love's Labours Lost).

As we move through the plays, we'll investigate the performance practices of medieval and early modern drama in England.  We'll look at documents and visual images--printed woodblock images, paintings, etc.-that will illuminate these practices before and during Shakespeare's time.  By the time we complete the course, we may want to sign up for the York Theatre Royal's next production of early English drama.

*Did the devils really shoot fireworks from under their tails?  Let's find out.

ENGL 223C: Literature of the Americas:  Revolutionary Americas
"How is it," the English writer Samuel Johnson asked in 1775, "that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty from the drivers of Negroes?" Johnson's stinging question reveals that the struggles for political independence in the Americas at the end of the eighteenth century were inextricably intertwined with the existence and expansion of chattel slavery. This course introduces students to the discourses and intersecting cultural production of forms of freedom and unfreedom-particularly gender inequality, slavery, and racism-in North America and the Caribbean.  We will examine how discourses of race, masculinity, and femininity shape ideas of liberty in the United States, Haiti, and the British West Indies.  We will then trace the repercussions of these discourses through the British abolition of slavery in 1833 in to the end of chattel slavery in the United States during the Civil War.  Our discussions will focus on the messy and incomplete processes of social and personal transformation using a wide range of readings, from Thomas Jefferson's rough draft of the Declaration of Independence and the Haitian Constitution of 1804 to fictional works that shed light on the revolutionary roads not taken, such as Leonora Sansay's Secret History (1808) of the Haitian Revolution and Herman Melville's "Benito Cereno" (1855).

ENGL 315A:  Writing in Business
The overall objective of this course is for students to learn and practice various forms of writing for business, government, and non-governmental organizations. These include résumés, cover letters, formal reports, professional presentations, grant proposals, advertising copy for TV and radio, communications for emerging social media outlets, business plans, formal and informal memos, various forms of print media, etc. In the process, students will have opportunities to consider various career options and look ahead to professional life after college.  In addition to the academic work in the classroom, students will hear from a number of business people as those business owners, middle-managers, elected officials, and potential co-workers come to class willing to share their collective wisdom about writing and communicating in the business environment. All-in-all, this class will help students realize that the theory and "book-learnin'" they experience in the academic arena really do have practical applications and a place in the world outside of academia.
PREREQUISITE:  completion of first-year seminar.

ENGL 348A:  Rags to Riches
From current legislation titles like the DREAM Act, to headlines that tell us it is "Harder for Americans to Rise from Lower Rungs," recent events have prompted many US Americans to examine the beliefs described by the phrase "the American dream."  This national ethos explains that the United States is exceptional because its political, economic, and social systems provide individuals with unique opportunities for social mobility and success through hard work.  It is an ethos supported by numerous "rags to riches" stories of men and women who built new lives within the United States.  And it is an ethos that the financial crisis of 2007 has brought under increasing scrutiny.  In this course, we will ask, "How did these ideas of self-making and success emerge and develop in American literary culture?"  "How and why is personal identity related to forms of production and consumption-and should it be?"  Our inquiry will push back beyond the traditional grounding of the American Dream in the phrase "all men are created equal" from the Declaration of Independence to the colonial captivity narrative.  We will then move forward into the nineteenth century, using the popular personal narratives and novels that were not afraid to engage with the role that sex, addiction, and discrimination played in American self-making.  We will discover the Benjamin Franklin they didn't teach you about in grade school in his Autobiography, savor a little family scandal in The Coquette (1797) and Ruth Hall (1855), and spend Ten Nights in a Bar-room (1855) before coming to the full flowering of the American dream in Horatio Alger's novel Ragged Dick (1867).  These texts will help us to consider how religion, gender, class, and race shape the discourses of identity, success and failure that ultimately constitute the American Dream.  We will ask what, if any, aspect of this dream is uniquely American and which, if any elements, we want to continue dreaming ourselves.

ENGL 365:  Current Issues in Lit Studies
This course offers a culminating opportunity for English majors to synthesize their college work, especially much of what they have learned in their English courses.  The English Department has established this course to bring English majors into contact with each other over a semester to read, reflect, and write about a common reading list.  Students in this course will gain a heightened awareness of the history, content and theoretical approaches to the discipline of English, will develop a substantial understanding of their major within the larger context of its discipline, and will come to know well their immediate community of majors.

"Current Issues in Literary Studies" is organized around a reading list entitled "Books Every English Major Should Read."  Because this course is a requirement of the English Department, it will be taught at different times by different faculty members and each faculty member will have a different reading list.  My list will include novels, collections of poetry, films, works of Critical Theory, and Cultural Studies.  Each category will be represented by selected works that "every English major should" know.

The major texts for the course will be chosen from the categories listed above.  Our texts will include:  Ernest Hemingway, Winner Take Nothing (short stories), Walter Mosley, A Red Death (novel in a series), W.  B.  Yeats, Selected Poems, Anne Sexton, Transformations, Adrienne Rich, An Atlas of the Difficult World or The Art of the Possible, Gary Snyder, Turtle Island, Walter Benjamin, Illuminations or Reflections.  One or two other texts including another novel will be chosen at a later date and films will be chosen in consultation with the class.  I will provide a list of further reading suggestions; these suggestions will serve as souvenirs of a CSBSJU English major and may be read at any time in the future

ENGL 386:  Studies in Film:  It's Film Heaven:  Analyzing Genre Films in an Interpretive Community
Luke Mancuso
Cross-listed with COMM 386
The English/Communication 386 course is an advanced course in the English/Communication Department sequence of upper-division courses at CSB/SJU.  It is also a liberal arts course. As an advanced course, it seeks to build on foundational skills you have encountered (such as effective critical thinking, reading, writing, and oral communication skills in Core and Humanities) so that you can pursue upper-division academic work (in this case, a specific exploration of one facet of film studies)  competently, efficiently, and even in leadership roles.  As a liberal arts course, English/Comm 386 deals with contemporary social values in culture (personal identity, film viewing habits, gender positions, class positions, narrative representations), and how those social values shape, determine, regulate our individual responses to everyday life.  In other words, this liberal arts story is your story. There are several components of a liberal arts learning environment: 

  • critical thinking
  • perceptive analysis
  • adapt better to change (seeing things from other perspectives)
  • development as a whole person (in a social context)

You will leave this course with a wider set of questions about your identity as film viewers than the ones you came with, by recognizing your interconnectedness to others.  We read 30 essays, and analyze 100 scenes together, selected by students, in the collaborative learning community across the semester. 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

ENTR 310:  Social Entrepreneurship
Social Entrepreneurs identify and address social issues using entrepreneurial principles and approaches. They act as change agents at the local, national, and often global level and focus on creating value for those around them. An introduction to social entrepreneurship, this course will engage students in identifying important issues in today's world and creating potential entrepreneurial approaches to address those issues. Students will become familiar with this new field, meet active social entrepreneurs and develop their own social venture plans.
PREREQUISITE:  Instructor permission, preference to students with service learning or nonprofit volunteer experience.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVR 215:  Sustainability Workshop:  Edible Gardens|
In this course we examine edible gardens from the Victory Gardens during WWII to the growing popularity of school yard garden, urban gardens, and greenhouse gardens through a variety of readings and activities,  We explore the connection of these gardens to the local food movement, to food deserts, to community development, to health issues and to food needs. In addition, we analyze their limitations, including, for example, costs, locations, ordinances and management.  Students research, design and/or implement a sustainable edible garden. Field trips to local gardens will provide examples of theory in practice.

ETHICS

ETHS 390-01A & 02A: Reading for Life
Anthony Cunningham
Everyone loves a good story. Great stories can provide us with far more than mere recreation. Stories can provide us with rich character portraits that can reveal the subtleties and nuances of what it means to live well and responsibly. In this course we'll use novels and films to address Socrates' most basic ethical questions, "How should one live?" and "What sort of person should I be?" We'll do so by attending to all the concrete, particular details of real life and fictional characters thoroughly embroiled in the "business of living." Reading well offers the possibility of vicarious experience and ultimately, ethical insight.  Our readings will include The Crucible (Arthur Miller), Ransom (David Malouf), The Remains of the Day (Kazuo Ishiguro), Beloved(Toni Morrison), How To Be Good (Nick Hornby), Reading in the Dark (Seamus Deane), and Cold Mountain (Charles Frazier).

ETHS 390-03A: Justice in the Twenty-First Century
Dan Finn
Few issues are as fundamental to human life as justice, and few are as controversial.  This course will examine in detail six different understandings of justice, each of which is a rival to the others in debates about justice in the twenty-first century.  Students will be reading two novels, and six philosophical or theological treatments of the notion of justice in our joint efforts to come to grips with what justice means in our lives: personally and on a national and global scale.

ETHS 390-04A: Sport Ethics
Janna LaFountaine
This course will introduce students to a variety of theories of moral reasoning, ethical and unethical behavior in sport, and the development of moral education through sport. Students will engage in learning about how they should act in order to suppose the moral foundation necessary for sport to function. Students will wrestle with the questions such as "how should I act' or "what type of an athlete, coach, official, manager, fan or parent should I be" through readings and discussions. Decision-making models based on moral reasoning theory and other principles of strategic reasoning will be employed as students navigate case studies and issues related to sport.

ETHS 390-05A: Contemporary Moral Problems: Lies, Sex & Work
Kari-Shane Zimmerman
This course attends to contemporary moral problems in the following areas:  lies, sex, and work.  In exploring these "problem areas" of morality, it also seeks to attend to connections between them and to question whether allowing problems to drive our moral reflection is the best approach when attempting to make good moral judgments.  In addition, the course will attend to the relationship between persons, virtues, and acts and between areas of morality typically considered "personal" and those considered to be "social".  The approach will be interdisciplinary, but we will accent Christian theological approaches in the areas of lying, sexuality, and work.  Also, additional course goals include (but are not limited to) enhancing students' ability to read texts closely, both critically and charitably, as well as improving students' ability to express themselves both orally and in writing.  There are no course prerequisites.

ETHS 390-06A:  Business Ethics
Jean Ochu
Is business ethics an oxymoron?  If you read newspaper articles that describe corporate misconduct and felonious behavior by corporate executives your conclusion would be yes.  We will examine the ethical choices individuals must inevitably make in their business and professional lives.  We will examine ethical philosophical concepts that are relevant to resolving the moral issues in business.  We will identify the moral issues involved in specific problem areas of business and determine the reasoning needed to apply ethical concepts to business decisions.  Business ethics has an interdisciplinary character.  We will examine issues in politics, sociology, economics, environment, and social justice.  This course will be primarily discussion based through the use of case studies and actual moral dilemmas faced by individuals in business.  Students would have taken at least one course in accounting, management, or economics and/or have interest in business.

ETHS 390-07A:  Happiness Is.....
Rodger Narloch
When people are asked what they want in life, a common response is that they just want to be happy.  But what is happiness and how do we attain it?  In this course, we will discuss a variety of different perspectives on these questions.  We will address what self-focused happiness might look like, but then transition to questions of how an individual's happiness relates to the happiness of others (and which others?).  Furthermore, we will discuss what it means to be morally good and the extent to which being good is a necessary component in being happy.  Finally, we will think about the nature of choices and decision making, especially as they relate to the formation of one's identity and vocation or path in life.  Ultimately, students will have to propose their own educated model or theory of happiness and articulate its implications for how they plan to live their lives.  These topics will be covered through extensive class discussion based on significant amounts of writing in response to readings from philosophical, psychological, as well as Catholic and Benedictine perspectives.

HONR 390-01A:  Honors Ethics Seminar:  The Medical Professional in the Modern World
Jeff Anderson
The word "professional" today connotes an individual with well-developed skills, specialized knowledge, and expertise, who conforms to the standards of a profession.  The original meaning of "professional" as one who "makes a profession of faith" in the face of demanding circumstances has been all but lost in the medical profession.  This class will use the burgeoning literature of medicine, written by, for, and about medical professionals, in order to explore the full range of "professional" challenges facing today's medical professionals.

The practice of medicine is rife with ethical dilemmas.  By exploring the efforts of medical professionals to counter the institutional forces that constrain them and to find their own solid ground to stand upon, this course aims to cultivate the habit of moral reflection in future medical professionals.  Although this course will primarily focus on the experiences of medical doctors, it should also be of interest to those aspiring to other medical and non-medical careers.

HONR 390-02A:  Honors Ethics Seminar:  Markets, Identity & Justice
James Read
The theme of this section of Honors 390 is "Markets, Identity, and Justice." We will examine several competing contemporary theories of justice (including John Rawls' "justice as fairness," Robert Nozick's free-market libertarian justice, and Charles Taylor's understanding of justice as mutual recognition) and apply those theories of justice to two important types of contemporary political conflict involving ethical choice: distributional politics and identity politics.

Should the wealthy be taxed to support health care for the poor?  Should the operations of the free market be guided by principles of justice -- and if so, by which principles of justice?  These questions involve ethical choice with respect to economic distribution, and we face them every time we vote, or debate about tax policy, or volunteer at a homeless shelter.

But contemporary debates about justice are not limited to distribution of material goods and economic opportunities.  They also involve arguments about whether and in what way justice requires recognition of someone's ethnic, racial, sexual, religious, or national identity.  Advocates of same-sex marriage rights, for example, do not demand a redistribution of wealth but instead a change in the way their fellow citizens talk about, think about, and publicly recognize same-sex relationships.  When Muslim girls wear head scarves to public schools in France, is this an affirmation of religious freedom and cultural heritage, or a rejection of French identity and a badge of women's submission?

Identity politics can become especially fierce when each group perceives the other's identity as a threat to its own.  What principles of justice, if any, can guide our decisions - personal and political - about who to recognize and how?

This course seeks to make students more aware of the political and personal choices they make every day that implicate questions of both distributional and "recognitional" justice.

PHIL 321: Moral Philosophy
This course will explore the meaning of rights and responsibilities, virtues and vices, values and obligations. It will raise questions of good and evil, right and wrong, freedom and determination. Approaches to morality considered will include virtue ethics, Kantian duty ethics, utilitarianism and other theories of moral thought.

PHIL 322: Environmental Ethics
This course investigates a variety of ethical issues that arise from consideration of the relation between humans and the non-human natural world (i.e., the environment, animals, land, ecosystems, wilderness areas). This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of environmental ethics, to specific ethical issues associated with environmental policy, and to philosophical theorizing about the environment.

PHIL 325: Feminist Ethics
Consideration of whether women's experiences offer unique perspectives in moral theory. Comparison of feminine and feminist approaches to ethics. Possible topics include: the nature of feminism, freedom and oppression; the role of care, trust, autonomy, reason and emotion in the moral life; different moral voices among women.

GENDER & WOMEN'S STUDIES

GEND 360A:  Colonial Violence:  Mother/Daughter
This course considers how the figure of the mother in colonial contexts is depicted and imagined from the perspective of the daughter. After a brief introduction of women's autobiographical writings and psychoanalytic theories of motherhood by Irigaray, Kristeva and Klein, we explore a number of questions: do the daughter's views differ depending on whether she belongs to the race of the colonizer or the colonized? Do any discrepancies exist in the daughter's mind between the representation of the mother and the idea of nation? How do heterosexual and/or interracial relationships complicate her relationship with the mother? How does sexual victimization of the daughter affect all of these? Readings include works by Kyoko Hayashi, Takako Takahashi, Taeko Kono, Hiromi Ito, Marguerite Duras, a Filipina ex-comfort woman Maria Rosa Henson, bell hooks, Toni Morrison, and Doris Lessing.

HISPANIC STUDIES

HISP 355E:  (IN)VISIBLE WOMEN: TWENTIETH CENTURY SPANISH THEATER AND GENDER
The objective of this course is to study the most prolific Spanish playwrights of the 20th century (i.e., Gracia Lorca, Valle Inclán, Buero Vallejo, etc.) from a variety of perspectives, applying various theoretical tools including feminist theory.  We will focus on gender relations, the transformation of the female subject, and feminine space.  We will explore how the social and political changes of each period affected women's lives and the literary and artistic production in Spain.
PREREQUISITE:  HISP 312 and one more HISP course. This course fulfills the literature requirement for Hispanic Studies majors

HISP 356G:  Seminar: Hispanic Culture:  Global Waste in a Latin American Focus:  Úselo y tírelo
Waste is the shameful secret of all modern consumer society: dark, forgotten, disgusting.  What a society throws away, though, may define it as much as what it produces.  Many would say that this world is overflowing with excess (excess stuff, excess waste, excess people).  All this excess is in part a problem of History.  We need to get rid of the old to make room for the new.  We need garbage collectors to bolster our collective amnesia.  Taking as its point of view specific sites in Latin America, this course will explore our collective global waste management problem.  Waste as reality and as metaphor will offer the unifying thread for an exploration of topics such as: social outcasts, shantytowns, margins, cultural difference, and the role of memory.  We will look at contemporary essays, literary texts, testimonios, and documentary films to develop and apply skills for cultural analysis.  All course participants will develop a research project making use of the lens of waste or wasted lives. 
PREREQUISITE:  HISP 312 and one additional HISP course at 320 or above.
Fulfills the Culture requirement for Hispanic Studies Majors.  Applies toward completion of LLAS minor.

HISP 360A:  Latin American Soap Operas
Sometimes conservative and sometimes transformative the 'telenovela' is the most influential  mass media form in Latin America.  It reaches a far more diverse audience and a much larger percentage of national viewers than does the American 'soap opera.' More importantly, it provides its viewers a virtual, simultaneous conversation about gender roles, race and class structure, and national, regional and global identities.  In this class we will study important theoretical, sociological and historical aspects of the telenovela and will apply these to the close analysis of the Colombian hit telenovela "Sin tetas no hay paraíso."  All coursework will be conducted in Spanish. 
PREREQUISITE:  HISP 312 or permission of professor.

HISTORY

HIST 200:  Sophomore Colloquium:  "Reel History"
Historians and historical filmmakers share a common methodology: both generally select and evaluate facts from various sources in order to interpret events from the past. Although traditionally historians have relied on written material such as newspapers and diaries to reflect the society that produced them, filmmakers manipulate images with the same goal. Written works of history and historical films both reflect flawed and biased views of the past; each type of interpretation presents just as much about the concerns of the age in which they were created as they do about the past.

This course is not a history of film but rather an investigation of film as historical source. Students will address such issues as the legitimate use of film in historical interpretation and will compare film and written sources in creating an understanding of the past. Students will also develop criteria for the critical evaluation of historical films.

HIST 381:  Readings Seminar:  Medieval Warfare
Historians have described Europe during the middle ages as a "society organized for war." Planning and preparing for war touched on almost every aspect of life: the organization of government, the structures of society, religious beliefs, taxation, the economy, town planning, the arts and architecture, and the development of technology. Despite the influence of military preparation on almost every aspect of medieval life, actual warfare during the middle ages was limited by geography and class. Battles very rarely changed the course of history.

This section of HIST 381 will focus on recent and classic works of history that explore issues related to warfare in medieval Europe. The students will read a variety of historical monographs that use different sources, methods, and approaches to explore topics like urban organization, castle construction, family influence upon the decision to go on crusader, financing military campaigns, and other topics.

The class will be structured as a discussion-based seminar, with books taking center stage. Students will also learn how to locate, use, and write critical book reviews as part of the process of mastering the historical monograph as a form of historical inquiry and argument.

HIST 389:  Historiography and Methods
*This section of HIST 389 is designed for Social Science majors who are Secondary Education minors.  This course does not count towards the history major.
This course has multiple goals.   At the most basic level, it is intended to make you more familiar with the history of the United States and how the stories of the American past have evolved and changed.  We will pay some particular attention to the experience of Minnesotans - including Native Americans - in that larger narrative.  It is also designed to increase your readiness to teach High School History and to send you into student teaching with an greater understanding, confidence, even a set of notes that will inform your classroom work.  The course will also be of value and interest to students who would like an overview of American History and would like to "do" some history.

HIST 395:  Historiography and Methods:  History, Memory & the Politics of Remembering
In HIST 395, students are expected to develop the research skills and historiographical awareness required for their independent projects in HIST 399 Senior Thesis, the History capstone course.  Our subjects are the concepts of "history" and "memory," i.e., the ways in which societies and people interpret the past, what they remember, and why they remember.  Readings will include brief theoretical works as well as monographs that examine history and memory in Europe and the United States.  Specifically, the readings will address various forms of memory work such as memorials, museums, historic sites, commemorative practices, debates over the past, and the construction of national identity.  Course work will emphasize understanding the historiographical context - that means we will work to understand how a given reading fits into a larger scholarly debate.  For their final projects, students will select their own history/memory topic (in any field) and employ their skills to design and complete a historiographical essay.  The relationship of history and memory is centrally important to the work of the historian, so our course will not only develop reading and research skills but also provide an opportunity to understand how and why history matters to us as individuals and societies.

HONORS

HONR 220B:  Introduction to Human Communication
This course provides students with a general overview of communication theory and research, particularly as it relates to their everyday interactions.  The course covers theories related to interpersonal, group, organizational, contexts, as well as gender and intercultural theories. Differences in scientific versus interpretative theories are explored, as well as criteria for good theories.  Solid grounding in a variety of communication theories prepares students well for upper division communication courses.  Because many communication theories incorporate concepts from other fields of study, it also provides students with useful knowledge for courses outside our department.

HONR 230C:  Romantic Spirit in the Arts
A study of the spirit of Romantic thought in music and other art forms.  Individualism, exoticism, love of nature, nationalism and the macabre all play roles in the output of the Romantic artist.  A heightened sense of self worth and value of all human individuals is bound up in the same philosophy.  A portion of our time will be spent on music and art forms from the 1960's, and their similarities with 19th century output.  The prime goal of the course will be recognition of the Romantic spirit and style in diverse forms of music and literature.

HONR 230F:  Introduction to Modern Dance
This class is an exploration of movement fundamentals for the purpose of developing and strengthening individual creativity and artistic expression in dance.  Class work is designed to: 1) give individuals a basic understanding of anatomical structure and kinesiological principles as a foundation for developing technical skills needed to create articulate and expressive movements; 2) Provide an embodied experience of time, space and energy principles as related to dance; 3) demystify dance as an art form and make it accessible and relevant to all. 

HONR 240A:  The Biblical Tradition
The Christian Tradition is as specific as it is vast.  The Bible is at the core of this Tradition, and its pages have inspired men and women for over 2000 years with its engagement of the central questions of human existence.  Simultaneously, these same people and their reflections have helped with the interpretation of the Bible.  This course will study Sacred Scripture by carefully reading and analyzing the text and by investigating the various responses the text has engendered throughout history and today.  

HONR 250C:  Great Issues in Philosophy
Is the way things appear to us the way they really are? If not, do we have any access to the way things really are? How? And if we don't, how could we ever know or even suspect that the way things appear to us isn't perhaps the way they really are? These questions have been with philosophers ever since humankind began to wonder about themselves and the world they live in. And when the questions change from "What is true about the physical nature of the world?" to "What is beauty?" "What  is goodness or virtue?" or "Is there a God and can we know anything about this God?" the problem becomes yet more urgent.

We will explore the relation of our knowing to the world first through a contemporary introduction to the problem, and then by looking at the stands taken by representative philosophers on the question of human knowing: Plato and Socrates, Rene Descartes, Bertrand Russell, and José Ortega y Gasset.

HONR 250R:  The Empire Writes Back:  Literature, Resistance & the Dialogic Imagination
Nothing conclusive has yet taken place in the world, the ultimate word of the world and about the world has not yet been spoken, the world is open and free, everything is still in the future and will always be in the future.  (Mikhail Bakhtin, Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics)

"The Empire writes back with a vengeance," wrote Salman Rushdie back in 1982, heralding the success of writers from the erstwhile British Empire who were not only contesting colonial narratives and debunking colonial myths, but were also challenging the very notion of "English." Many of these writers, little known in the early 1980s, have become familiar to readers all across the world: Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Jamaica Kincaid, Derek Walcott, R.K.  Narayan, V.S.  Naipaul, and of course, Rushdie himself.  Their literary prominence has been such (three of the writers named above have won the Nobel Prize) that many English Departments now claim to teach "Literatures in English" rather than "English" or "American" Literature.

This course focuses on the ways in which the dominant narratives of Empire (not just the old British one, but the current de-centred one as well) have been challenged, resisted, and re-told.  It takes its cue from the work of the Russian philosopher and literary critic, Mikhail Bakhtin, who gave us the concept of dialogism.  Any utterance-spoken or written- responds to some earlier utterance and anticipates a future one, Bakhtin argued.  Because dialogic expression is always incomplete, always oriented towards the unrealized future, it resists authoritarian interpretations.  In this course we will read a number of texts (some "classics," some iconoclastic) dialogically to understand better how the authority of literary texts is constructed and resisted-both internally and externally.

Sample "clusters" of texts: 1) William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Aimé Cesaire, A Tempest; Elizabeth Nunez, Prospero's Daughter.  2) Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; J.M. Coetzee, Foe; Kunal Basu, The Racists.  3) Anonymous, A Woman of Colour; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea.

HONR 270C: Problem Solving
An introduction to solving complex problems in interdisciplinary topics which will be drawn from mathematics, computer science, and physics.  Students will work in groups and present their results.
PREREQUISITE:  MATH 119 and admission to MAPCORES program or consent in instructor.

HONR 310:  Great Books/Ideas
The Great Books course is a year-long discussion-based seminar focused on some of the world's greatest works of literature, philosophy, and intellectual history.  The students will purchase a personal library of a hundred books, from which we will choose many during the summer and academic year to read and discuss as a preparation for a lifetime of intellectual and literary activity.  Students are specially selected on the basis of demonstrated ability to converse about sophisticated works, and they will work together to enhance each other's understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the first-rate books that will engage our attention.  The professor serves as guide and facilitator of discussion, leaving it to the group to get the most out of these books.  The list includes the usual suspects such as Homer, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Austen, Tolstoy, Faulkner, Woolf, and Joyce.  It also introduces some works by authors not as widely known, including Dinesen, Pynchon, Saramago, Byatt, Laxness, and Ishiguro.  Those interested need to apply with Scott Richardson, and a group of twenty will be selected.
Permission of instructor required to enroll

HONR 340F:  The Reality of God
This course explores Christian and Jewish perspectives on the meaning of the existence, nature, attributes, revelation, and presence of God.  Special emphasis is given to the sources of and challenges to monotheistic faith, the variety of Christian and Jewish perspectives on God, monotheistic approaches to religious diversity, the relationship between morality and faith in God, feminist critiques of and alternatives to traditional patriarchal perspectives on God, and the effects of scientific knowledge on beliefs about God.

HONR 340J:  Justice in Sexuality & Relationships
Given the inescapable complexities surrounding human sexuality, gender, and embodiment, how might we live and relate to one another in ways that are increasingly fulfilling, and in ways that deepen our relationships with ourselves, others, and God? This course will introduce students to the methodology of Christian ethics, i.e., the process of drawing upon sources of knowledge (scripture, tradition, reason, and contemporary experience) to formulate responses to contemporary issues regarding sexuality and relationships. Specifically, we will be exploring the concept of justice as it relates to sex, contemporary hookup culture, love, and relationships. In the end, students will be equipped to construct and articulate a compelling theological sexual ethic for college students in 2013.

HONR 350P:  Souls, Selves, and Persons:  Human Nature & Our Place in the Universe
What am I? This question will be explored through the study of three periods marked by a change in scientific paradigms: the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth century, the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species in the nineteenth century and the rise of cognitive science in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We'll read philosophers, scientists, historians, and novelists, as well as explore pieces by performance and visual artists. By the end of the course, you should have a basic understanding of different metaphysical views about human nature - from the claim that humans are fundamentally autonomous and independent to the view that human nature derives from the unique social bonds that we form. We will study various accounts of the relationship between the mind and the body, especially dualism and materialism, and how these theories are shaped by various philosophical and scientific commitments. In studying these topics, you will learn to recognize in past debates a reflection of contemporary struggles over human nature and our place in the natural world. No prerequisites.

HONR 370B:  Research Seminar
Solving Complex problems in interdisciplinary topics which will be drawn from mathematics, computer science, and physics.  Students will work in groups and present their results.
PREREQUISITE:  HONR 270C and admission to MAPCORES program or consent of instructor.

HONR 390-01A:  Honors Ethics Seminar:  The Medical Professional in the Modern World
Jeff Anderson
The word "professional" today connotes an individual with well-developed skills, specialized knowledge, and expertise, who conforms to the standards of a profession.  The original meaning of "professional" as one who "makes a profession of faith" in the face of demanding circumstances has been all but lost in the medical profession.  This class will use the burgeoning literature of medicine, written by, for, and about medical professionals, in order to explore the full range of "professional" challenges facing today's medical professionals.

The practice of medicine is rife with ethical dilemmas.  By exploring the efforts of medical professionals to counter the institutional forces that constrain them and to find their own solid ground to stand upon, this course aims to cultivate the habit of moral reflection in future medical professionals.  Although this course will primarily focus on the experiences of medical doctors, it should also be of interest to those aspiring to other medical and non-medical careers.

HONR 390-02A:  Honors Ethics Seminar:  Markets, Identity & Justice
James Read
The theme of this section of Honors 390 is "Markets, Identity, and Justice." We will examine several competing contemporary theories of justice (including John Rawls' "justice as fairness," Robert Nozick's free-market libertarian justice, and Charles Taylor's understanding of justice as mutual recognition) and apply those theories of justice to two important types of contemporary political conflict involving ethical choice: distributional politics and identity politics.

Should the wealthy be taxed to support health care for the poor?  Should the operations of the free market be guided by principles of justice -- and if so, by which principles of justice?  These questions involve ethical choice with respect to economic distribution, and we face them every time we vote, or debate about tax policy, or volunteer at a homeless shelter.

But contemporary debates about justice are not limited to distribution of material goods and economic opportunities.  They also involve arguments about whether and in what way justice requires recognition of someone's ethnic, racial, sexual, religious, or national identity.  Advocates of same-sex marriage rights, for example, do not demand a redistribution of wealth but instead a change in the way their fellow citizens talk about, think about, and publicly recognize same-sex relationships.  When Muslim girls wear head scarves to public schools in France, is this an affirmation of religious freedom and cultural heritage, or a rejection of French identity and a badge of women's submission?

Identity politics can become especially fierce when each group perceives the other's identity as a threat to its own.  What principles of justice, if any, can guide our decisions - personal and political - about who to recognize and how?

This course seeks to make students more aware of the political and personal choices they make every day that implicate questions of both distributional and "recognitional" justice.