Mark Isaacson

April 29, 2012

Mark Isaacson recently graduated with a major in Management and a minor in Sports Medicine. He is currently finishing his second year at the University of Wisconsin- La Crosse studying in the Human Performance program, with research areas of interest of strength and conditioning, bioenergetics, and muscle physiology. He then plans to continue on and pursue a PhD, and eventually teach and research at a university.

During his time as CSB-SJU he was a strength and conditioning assistant for two years and a strength and conditioning manager for a year, with provided him with experience and a strong foundation for his research as La Crosse.  When questioned about his experiences as a Sports Medicine student Mark says:

"I was prepared extremely well for the graduate program here at La Crosse because the Sports Medicine program concentrated on the applied side of exercise science. We had first hand experience in the lab in exercise physiology, kinesiology, and motor learning. Graduate school is much more of a self-driven experience where you can choose what you like and start becoming an expert on that."

With a major in Management, Mark talked about his scientific preparation for his program at La Crosse.  "Students in my program and these other programs have their B.S. in biology, exercise physiology, nursing, and other related fields. I had 20 credits in Sports Medicine and no other science background. The program did an excellent job preparing me for this level. Though I had some "catching up" to do in some areas, I was prepared as well as or even better than other students in many exercise related areas (i.e. Biomechanics)."

Mark's experiences in the Sports Medicine program have allowed him to adapt to other stressful situations in life. He says, "There always will be challenges in school, work, and life. I believe the Sport Medicine program prepared me to face these challenges and overcome obstacles."

Mark Isaacson

Mark's advice to current or future Sports Medicine students:

"To challenge themselves as much as possible and experience as much as you can within your area of study. I originally thought I was going to be a strength and conditioning coach, but the more I learned in class and the more I worked with athletes, I learned that it was not just strength and conditioning I enjoyed, but it was really the teaching I enjoyed. Combine the teaching with my passion for learning and the two things kind of fell in place. Don Fischer and the rest of the Sports Medicine professors always challenged me academically as well as outside the classroom. Don treated every experience as a learning experience."

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