Please update your web browser or disable Compatibility View.

Fall 2017 Course Offerings

ART 208  Non-Western Art Survey
Dr. Carol Brash, TR, 9:35, SJU
Selected survey of great architecture, sculpture and painting of Asia and other non-Western cultures. A study of artworks in relation to religion, culture, philosophy and geography of the non-Western world.

ART 240 Photography in China
Dr. Carol Brash, TR, 11:10, SJU
By the 1840s, the medium of photography had arrived in China. Nearly two centuries later, it is still a powerful and popular medium. This writing- and discussion- intensive course explores some of the major themes addressed by photographers in China over this long history: the photograph as art, science, document, propaganda, popular culture, memory, identity. It focuses on the history of photography in China, the visual analysis of images, and a discussion
of how a viewer’s context plays a role in understanding the works. Although the primary topic is the history of photography as art in China by Chinese artists, the course includes a brief history of photography as art in the west and also
examines western photographers who focus on China as a subject. Students will investigate both primary texts (the photographs, writings by photographers and artists, etc.), and secondary texts (scholarly articles and books about the
photographs, artists, etc.).

ASIA 399 Asian Studies Capstone
Dr. Sophia Geng, T, 6:15, CSB
In this Asian Studies capstone, students will write a paper that showcases their understanding of the Asian Studies field by focusing in-depth on one topic selected in consultation with the course instructor and others. Students will research and prepare a paper suitable for presentation on Celebrating Scholarship and Creativity Day during the spring semester of the junior or senior year, depending on progression through the major and when the student studies abroad.

CHIN 111 Elementary Chinese
Limei Danzeisen, MWF, 10:40, CSB
Introduction to the basic elements of the Chinese language. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including work with grammar, pronunciation, and culture.

CHIN 211 Intermediate Chinese
Limei Danzeisen, MWF, 9:30, CSB
Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 211 and 212 emphasize Chinese culture and civilization. Satisfactory completion of CHIN 211 fulfills the global language proficiency requirement.

CHIN 311 Chinese Conversation and Composition
Dr. Sophia Geng, TR, 1:05, CSB
Designed to help students solidify and further their communicative and writing ability in Chinese through contact with various written styles of modern Chinese. Advanced Chinese also provides a basic introduction to contemporary Chinese literature and culture. 311 and 312 may be taken in either order.

CHIN 321B Chinese Folklore Myths and Legends
Dr. Sophia Geng, TR, 2:40, CSB
In this class, we read the English translations of popular Chinese folklore.  These include the tale of Mulan, the story of the Cowherd and the Weaver Goddess, and the legend of Caiji. We analyze how the stories evolved throughout history and how they were told differently in mainstream and vernacular cultures. We also examine a number of adaptations of these stories in film, story-telling and writings by Chinese American authors, and compare the differences in terms of language, theme and function. Taught in English.

GEND 360E Contemporary Japanese Writers
Dr. Jeffrey Dubois, TR, 2:40, CSB
This course introduces entertainment novels, comics, and films created by Japanese female writers and directors since the 1970's. Postwar economic development made it possible for young talented women to go into a variety of cultural fields and become successful. We examine how these contemporary female creators have come to terms with issues of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation as well as how their products have intersected the changing phases of economic conditions. Their works have created new businesses, not only in Japan but also in the broader Asian market, by being combined with thriving local entertainment industries. We also consider what these phenomena signify, especially when the images of the West, Asia, the US and Japan are diversely
reflected in these works.

GEOG 230 World Geography
Luke Feieerabend, W, 6:15, CSB
A spatial frame of reference for the changing patterns of world events. Study of the relationships between physical and cultural environments and major, global issues such as population, pollution and economic change. Social Science and
ELED majors given preference.

GBUS 300 Global Enterprise
Dr. Rui Oliveira, TR, 11:10 & 12:45, SJU
This course covers the fundamental concepts, issues, and structure of 21st century global business. It explores the historical, cultural, economic, and political underpinnings of the basic themes of, and critical actors operating within international business today. The student learns about the nature of and relationships between the major components (or systems) that make up the international business system as a whole. Prerequisite GBUS 210, 220, 230, 240
or permission of instructor.

GBUS 321 Global Marketing
Dr. Tony Yan, MWF, 9:30, CSB
Dr. Sanford Moskowitz, TR, 2:20, SJU
An introduction to the activities, sets of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. This course will focus on global implications and strategies resulting from the examination of the marketing environment, marketing practices, and ethical issues in the marketing field. Prerequisite: GBUS 210, 220, 230 & 240 or permission of instructor.

HIST 115 Modern East Asia
Dr. Elisheva Perelman, MWF, 11:50, CSB
This introductory survey to East Asia examines the political, cultural, and social history of China (including the PRC, Taiwan, and Hong Kong), Japan, and Korea (including the DPRK and the ROK) from the 17th century to the present. Students will analyze primary texts, literary works, and documents to find issues of continuity and change over time and across borders.

HIST 319 Monsters and Modernity - Japanese History Through Horror
Dr. Elisheva Perelman, MWF, 2:10, CSB
This course examines horror in its myriad forms in the history and formation of modern Japan, from the Tokugawa period to the present.  By exploring the historical context in which literary works are produced and what the works represent, students will gain a broader understanding of what fears helped to shape modern Japanese culture, society, and history.

JAPN 111 Elementary Japanese
Dr. Jeffrey Dubois, MWF, 9:30 & 10:40, CSB
Introduction to the basic structure of the Japanese language. Practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing, with a focus on an accurate command of grammar and culturally appropriate communication skills.

JAPN 211 Intermediate Japanese
Masami Limpert, MWF, 9:30, CSB
Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Satisfactory completion of JAPN 211 fulfills the global language proficiency requirement.

JAPN 311 Advanced Japanese Language
Masami Limpert, MWF, 10:40, CSB
Review and continued development of grammar together with development of skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing.

JAPN 321A Contemporary Japanese Women Writers
Dr. Jeffrey Dubois, TR, 2:40, CSB
This course introduces entertainment novels, comics, and films created by Japanese female writers and directors since the 1970's. Postwar economic development made it possible for young talented women to go into a variety of cultural fields and become successful. We examine how these contemporary female creators have come to terms with issues of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation as well as how their products have intersected the changing phases of
economic conditions. Their works have created new businesses, not only in Japan but also in the broader Asian market, by being combined with thriving local entertainment industries. We also consider what these phenomena signify, especially when the images of the West, Asia, the US and Japan are diversely reflected in these works. Taught in English.

PHIL 156 Asian Philosophy
Dr. Charles Wright, TR, 8:00, SJU
An introduction to the foundational texts of the South Asian and Chinese philosophical traditions. Texts originating in South Asia (i.e., the Indian subcontinent) will include selections from the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, and early sutras from the Theravada Buddhist tradition. The Chinese traditions of Confucianism and Taoism will be approached through study of the Lao Tzu (a.k.a. the Tao Te Ching) and the Analects of Confucius.

POLS 121 Introduction to International Relations
Dr. Christi Siver, MWF 10:20 & TR 12:45, SJU
Students learn about global issues through different theoretical lenses, including realism and liberalism. Using these lenses, students investigate international security, civil conflict, economic interactions, and the influence of globalization. They also examine the influence of important actors in the international arena, including states, intergovernmental organizations, and non-governmental organizations. Students examine their understandings of culture and how it shapes understanding of concepts like human rights. This broad overview helps students have a better understanding of the world around them and how their worldview shapes their perceptions of international events. Every semester.

POLS 346 Asian Politics
Dr. John Friend, TR, 9:35, SJU
This course examines of the politics and economics of Asian countries, including India, China, and Japan. Contemporary politics is examined through a broad study of history, cultural and social traditions, and economic conditions as well as the political institutions and systems. The relationships between the United States and each of these nations are also studied in light of distinct foreign policy approaches.