German Studies

Major in German Studies (38 credits)

Required Courses:
212; 311 (or 315); 312 (or 316); 324 or 325; 20 additional upper-division credit hours with distribution across theme, genre and period; 399.

Major in German Studies/Secondary Education (38 credits)

Required Courses:
Same as concentration in German Studies, but must include 324 or 325.

Suggestion:
See the education department listing for minor requirements.

Minor (20 credits)

Required Courses:
212; 311 (or 315); 312 (or 316); 8 additional upper-division credits.

Courses (GERM)

111 Elementary German I. (4)
Basic elements of German. Practice in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing, including work with pronunciation, grammar, and culture. Designed for students with no prior study of German.

112 Elementary German II. (4)
Continuation of basic German with emphasis on acquiring communicative skills, both narrative and descriptive, in a variety of practical situations. Upon completion of this course, students are eligible for study abroad in Salzburg.

211 Intermediate German. (4)
Review and continued study of German structures, with an emphasis on the development of reading skills and the discussion of ideas. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the core foreign language proficiency requirement and prepares students for 212 (HML).

212 Introduction to German Culture. (4)
Study and analysis of cultural texts in German emphasizing contemporary issues. This course is required for students who wish to earn a major or minor in German. 212 fulfills a common curriculum HM requirement.

271 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

311 German Conversation and Composition I. (4)
An exploration of the cultures of German speaking countries, with an emphasis on the development of discussion skills in response to written texts and a variety of media.

312 German Conversation and Composition II. (4)
Discovery and analysis of German culture, with special emphasis on developing writing skills in response to written texts and a variety of other media.

324 Survey Pre-1850. (4)
A survey of some of the key figures and periods of German art, literature, music, and public life in German-speaking countries that have made significant cultural contributions to world civilization up to the early 19th century, focusing on literary and cultural trends and movements of the Middle Ages, the Reformation, the Baroque, and the Age of Goethe. Selected readings will include courtly epic, lyric poetry, drama, prose texts and narratives from some principal authors. Prerequisite: 212. Offered alternate years.

325 Survey 1850 Until Present. (4)
A survey of various periods of German art, literature, music, public life and people that have made significant cultural contributions to world civilization from the early 19th century to the present. The major purpose is to analyze the interrelationship between the major social/political developments of German-speaking Europe, and their cultural manifestations. Selected readings will include lyric poetry, essays, novellas, drama, and prose texts and narratives from some principal authors. Prerequisite: 212. Offered alternate years.

330 German Lands in Religious Transition: The Light and Dark of the Middle Ages Topics. (2-4)
Before the Common Era, Germanic tribes moved into central Europe and greatly affected the culture of the continent. This course explores the origins and effects of the united European Empire myth. It also looks at the ways in which religions and feudal structures impacted the culture, actions and art of a variety of Europe. Prerequisite: 212. Offered every three years. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content varies. Qualifies as a course in Period.

333 The Age of Goethe Topics. (2-4)
Goethe's genius challenged inherited literary forms, created new ones, and developed the expressiveness of the German language so profoundly that the effects are still felt today. Born to the upper middle class, but employed at court, Goethe recognized attempts by men and women to cross barriers--literary, cultural, national, gender, and spiritual. As a founder of German Classicism (along with Schiller), Goethe's cosmopolitan spirit and enthusiasm impacted Romantic thought and generations to come. Prerequisite: 212. Offered every third year. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Period.

337 The Fragile Phoenix; German Identity in the Early 20th Century Topics. (2-4)
The Weimer period is a time of tremendous creativity in art, architecture, literature, music and politics, when German-speaking lands find themselves caught between theories of democratic freedom and the slide into fascism. This period, punctuated by the new excitement with freedom and decadence, encompasses the rise and strengthening as as hints at the aftereffects of Hitler's Third Reich. Prerequisite: 212. Offered every third year. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Period.

342 German Poetry. (2-4)
Poetry expresses more emotion and content in fewer words than any other kind of literature. German lyric across the ages conveys the essence of the culture and gives readers texts that will have both personal and cultural meanings throughout their lives. Prerequisite: 212. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Period.

345 Novels, Novellen, Stories and Tales Topics. (2-4)
An exploration of the world of storytelling in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. This course investigates the phenomenon of narrative, its elements, techniques, and forms; its relation to other modes of discourse; its power and influence in cultures past and present. A variety of interpretive strategies include such activities as classroom storytelling, Nacherzählungen, interpretive presentations, skits and group discussions. Prerequisite: 212. Offered every third year. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Period.

349 The Romantic Quest in the Arts and Sciences: Nightingales, Posthorns and the Night Side of Nature. (4)
Romanticism began as a protest of German writers and scholars against the limits of the Enlightenment with its over-emphasis on reason. The Romantic strove to stretch beyond reason to embrace the irrational, the feared and the misunderstood. Seeking the unknown is still considered romantic today and thus is a force that ranges beyond any specific period of time. Nature, emotions and the infinite take on a central position. The mysterious, the miraculous and searching find expression in the works of these writers, musicians, artists, philosophers and scientists. Prerequisite: 212. Offered every three years. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Theme.

350 Eavesdropping on Germany: Current Debates and Issues Topics. (2-4)
A course based on today's explosive debates and issues in German-speaking countries using up-to-date materials from the internet, German radio, television, film, and newspapers. This is a course for researching and debating controversies and listening to provocative news. Prerequisite: 212. Offered every three years. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Theme.

355 Seminar in a Specific Period Topic. (2-4)
This course varies in the cultural period explored, but focuses on an especially significant or influential time in German history. The course will provide a framework for the understanding of the particular period in terms of philosophy, literature, music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and socio-political make-up and may focus on a topic such as: The Age of Luther; Fin de Siècle; or The Late Twentieth Century: War to Postwar, Wall to Post Wall. See semester class catalog for further details. Prerequisite: 212. Offered as needed. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Period.

356 Seminar in a Particular Genre Topic. (2-4)
A more intensive exploration of a specific genre. The course may focus on a genre such as: The Novelle From Its Beginnings into Modernity; The Drama as Multivalent Text; The Essay as Medium for Social Change; New German Cinema and Political Revolt. See semester class catalog for further details. Prerequisite: 212. Offered as needed. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Genre. 

357 Seminar in a Particular Theme Topic. (2-4)
A more intensive exploration of a specific theme or linguistic topic. The course may focus on a topic such as: The Holocaust, Its Origins and Effects; The Persistent Problem of Imported Labor; The Discourse of Evil in German Language Culture; Linguistic Style in Essays and Feuilleton; Marx, Freud and Nietzsche in the Modern World. See semester class catalog for further details. Prerequisite: 212; 311; 312 or concurrent enrollment in 311 or 312. Offered as needed. Can be repeated with permission of instructor if content differs. Qualifies as a course in Theme.

371 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

398 Honors Senior Essay, Research, or Creative Project. (4)
Required for graduation with "Distinction in German." Prerequisite: HONR 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see HONR 398.

399 Senior Project. (2)
All majors must present a senior project in a public forum. In consultation with a faculty advisor students choose a project appropriate to their previous course of study and/or their individual goals.

Courses taught abroad

115 Elementary German I Abroad.
116 Elementary German II Abroad.
215 Intermediate German I Abroad.
315 Conversation and Composition I Abroad.
316 Conversation and Composition II Abroad.
360 Advanced Grammar Abroad.
361 Selected Topics.
362 German Literature.