Chemistry

Chemistry

Department Chair: Henry Jakubowski 

Faculty: George Anquandah, Md Abul Fazal, Kate Graham, Henry Jakubowski, Brian Johnson, T. Nicholas Jones, Edward McIntee, Anna McKenna, Amber Onorato, Alicia Peterson, Michael Ross, Chris Schaller, Carleen Schomer OSB, Leo Seballos, Richard White

A degree in chemistry, in addition to being an excellent preparation for industrial employment, graduate study or secondary teaching, also prepares students to apply for further study in the areas of medicine, law, business administration, government service and agriculture science. To this end, the department offers a variety of introductory and advanced courses.

CHEM 125 is intended as an introductory chemistry course for all natural science majors.  It provides students with a comprehensive survey of chemical structure and ensuing chemical and physical properties that arise from structure.  CHEM 125, together with the separate lab course, CHEM 201, fulfills the Common Curriculum Natural Science requirement.  200-300 level courses are intended for the students seeking a major degree in chemistry or biochemistry, and a minor degree in chemistry; they also serve as supporting courses for students majoring in biology, natural science, or nutrition science, and for pre-health profession students.

Students majoring in nutrition with a dietetics concentration should take CHEM 107 after taking CHEM 125. CHEM 105 and 107 do not meet the prerequisites for any other chemistry course. CHEM 107 will no longer be offered after Spring 13.  Starting in Spring 2014, students majoring in nutrition with a dietetics concentration will take CHEM 250.

The Chemistry Department is in the midst of a major change in its curriculum that will result in changes in the required courses for science majors taking courses past CHEM 125. These changes will continue through Spring 2014. First year students enrolling in Fall 2011 will be the first to complete the full four years of the new curriculum.

The new curriculum consists of one introductory course (4 credits), five foundation courses (4 credits each), four separate foundation lab courses (0 or 1 credits each), one in-depth Integrated Lab course (4 credits each), and a series of half-semester in-depth courses (2 credits each).  In Fall 2013 and Spring 2014, Juniors (who enrolled in 2011) will take 2 credit in-depth courses while Seniors (who enrolled in 2010) will take four credit in-depth courses from our old curriculum.  In some cases, where possible and with the permission of the Department Chair, Seniors may be allowed to substitute two of the new in-depth courses for one, four credit course.

The overall structure of our new curriculum has been approved by the CSB/SJU Curriculum Committee.  Please consult the latest electronic versions of the course catalog for the most recent approved courses.

Assessment

Each year, the Chemistry Department assesses its overall program and its students in a number of ways. For example, several courses employ standardized final exams for which there are national norms. All chemistry majors are required to take a nationally-normed exam (CHEM XXX) in the spring of their senior year. In addition, senior majors are asked to complete an anonymous survey to probe the extent to which they believe the department meets its stated goals and objectives. Every 5-7 years, the department must be re-accredited by the American Chemical Society, and, at similar intervals, departmental alumni are polled to obtain their evaluation of the education they received in the department. All of this information is employed to improve our program and ensure that the educational opportunities we provide are the best possible. Based on our assessment program and new Common Curriculum requirements, we will continue to make changes in courses and requirements that will promote student learning.

Major

The Chemistry Department offers a single major in Chemistry with options for different concentrations and ACS certification.

  • For students enrolled before Fall 2011, students may choose either an American Chemical Society (ACS)-certified concentration or a traditional concentration;
  • For students enrolled in Fall 2011 and after, students can major in Chemistry without a specific concentration (any 3 half-semester in-depth courses required) or they can choose to take a concentration in Chemical Biology, Environmental Chemistry, or Industrial/Materials Chemistry (4 in-depth courses from specific list required).  Students with or without a concentration will be certified by the ACS if they take a total of six half-semester in-depth courses. 

In addition, an interdisciplinary biochemistry major is available (see Biochemistry major page).

In either our old or new curriculum, students who intend to pursue graduate work in chemistry and related fields, or those seeking immediate employment in chemical industry or government laboratories, should take sufficient courses to be certified by the ACS.  Students enrolling in Fall 2011 and later, can, in addition, choose either a specific concentration (Chemical Biology, Environmental Chemistry, or Industrial/Materials Chemistry) that would prepare them for a study in graduate school or for a particular industry.  They could also choose no concentration but still be ACS-certified which will prepare them well for graduate school or industry. 

Students who have an interest in chemistry, but are not necessarily planning to continue their study of chemistry at the graduate level, could major in chemistry with a traditional concentration (students enrolled before Fall 2011) or with (four in-depth courses) or without a concentration (three in-depth courses) but without ACS certification (students enrolled in Fall 2011 and later). This option is recommended for those planning careers in any of the medical fields, secondary education, patent law, government service, environmental science, as well as management-level positions in the chemical industry. 

Concentrations, but not ACS certification, will appear on a student's transcript.

For students enrolled before Fall 2011 (old curriculum): 

ACS Concentration (62 credits)
Required Courses:
CHEM 125 (taught in Fall 2010 with an attached lab), 234, 235, 236, 333, 334, 335, 336, 341, 349 and BCHM 322, plus either two credits or CHEM 360 or CHEM 398; PHYS 105, 106 or PHYS 191, 200; MATH 119, 120.  The Chemistry Comprehensive Exam (CHEM XXX) is also required. (Note: The ACS recommends either MATH 124 or 239, but they are no longer required.)

Traditional Concentration (50 credits)
Required Courses:
CHEM 125 (taught in Fall 2010 with an attached lab), 234, 235, 236, 333 or 334, 335, 349, two additional courses selected from 333, 334, 336, 341, and BCHM 322, plus either two credits CHEM 360 or CHEM 398; MATH 119, 120; PHYS 105, 106 or PHYS 191, 200. The Chemistry Comprehensive Exam (CHEM XXX) is also required.

Special Requirements For All Concentrations:
Senior majors are required to give a seminar presentation on their laboratory or library research (CHEM 360 or 398) and to take a comprehensive exam in chemistry (CHEM XXX).

For students enrolled Fall 2011 and after (new curriculum):

All majors must take the following chemistry courses:

  • Introductory Course:  CHEM 125;
  • Foundation 4 Credit Courses:  CHEM 250, 251, 252, 255 (all approved) and 318 (pending approval, Sp 2013);
  • Foundation 0 or 1 Credit Lab Courses:  CHEM 201, 202, 203, and 205 (all approved);
  • In-depth Integrated Lab Course:  CHEM 305
  • CHEM 349, CHEM 360 or CHEM 398, CHEM XXX.

In addition, all majors must take the following support courses:

  • MATH 119, MATH 120; (MATH 124 or 239 recommended)
  • PHYS 105 or 191; PHYS 106 or 200.

Majors must take the following 2 credit in-depth courses (CHEM 3XX, course numbers pending) depending on their choice of concentration and ACS Certification.  All CHEM 3XX course are pending approval)

No Concentration AND no ACS certification: Any 3 In-depth courses (CHEM 3XX,)

Chemical Biology Concentration AND no ACS certification: Chemical Biology (CHEM 3XX);  Three additional CHEM 3XX taken from the following:  Bioanalytical, Bioinorganic, Biophysical, Drug Design/ Medicinal Chemistry, Signal Transduction, Synthesis/Retrosynthetic  Analysis, Toxicology/ Metabolism;  BIOL 318: Molecular Genetics  OR appropriate courses from other departments approved by the Chemistry Department may substitute for CHEM 3XX course(s).  BIOL 121 and BIOL 221 are highly recommended for majors

Environmental Chemistry AND no ACS certification: Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 3XX); Three additional CHEM 3XX taken from the following:   Advanced Mechanistic Determinations, Advanced Separation Techniques, Catalysis, Structure Elucidation, Toxicology/ Metabolism; Appropriate courses from other departments approved by the Chemistry Department may substitute for CHEM 3XX course(s).

Materials/Industrial Chemistry AND no ACS certification: Chem Indust Topics (CHEM 3XX) and Materials/Nanomaterials Chemistry (CHEM 3XX); Two additional CHEM 3XX taken from the following: Advanced Separation Techniques (Science),  Environmental Chemistry, Bioanalytical Chemistry, Retrosynthetic Analysis /Synthesis.  Appropriate courses from other departments approved by the Chemistry Department may substitute for CHEM 3XX course(s).

ACS Certification:

Students taking any of the options above (no concentration or any of the concentration) can be certified by the ACS if they take a total of six, 2 credit in-depth courses. 

Total Number of Credits for the Chemistry Major (including support courses):

No Concentration: 52-57 without ACS Certification; 60-65 with ACS Certification

Chemical Biology, Environmental Chemistry, or Materials/Industrial Chemistry Concentrations: 56-61 credits w/o ACS; 60-65 with ACS Certification

Minor (24-28 credits)

The minor is recommended for those students whose major interests are in other academic areas, which can be strengthened by a concentration in chemistry.

Required Courses:

For students enrolled before Fall 2011: CHEM 125 (taught in Fall 2010 with an attached lab), 234, 235, 236, 335 and one of the following courses: 333, 334, 336, 341, or BCHEM 322.


For students enrolled in Fall 2011 and later: CHEM 125, 250, 251, 255, 315 and CHEM 318 (pending approval); CHEM 201, 202, 203 and 205 (0 or 1 credit labs).

Courses (CHEM)

105 Chemistry and Society. (4)
Fundamentals of chemistry are studied with the aim of gaining an understanding of the importance of chemistry for humanity and society. Topics of historical interest and current relevance are explored. Laboratory emphasis is on the principles of scientific inquiry, including the collection, analysis and interpretation of data. Intended primarily for non-science majors. Fall and spring.

107 Introduction to Chemistry and Biochemistry. (4)
A study of the chemistry and biochemistry necessary to gain a basic understanding of metabolic and cellular processes. A progressive study of atoms, bonding, and ionic and molecular structures, followed by intermolecular forces, reactions, mechanisms, and stoichiometry will provide the chemical knowledge required for students to understand basic organic chemistry, biomolecular structure, the Central Dogma of Biology, and an overview of metabolism. Intended for nutrition and dietetics majors.  Prerequisite: 125.  Spring.  This course will not be offered after Spring 2013.

115 Introductory Chemistry Topics 1. ( (0 or 1)
First year students intending to become Chemistry or Biochemistry majors will form a cohesive and supportive peer group as they are introduced to modern chemistry research and opportunities and develop practical and leadership skills. This course will be required of all students participating in the FoCuS program. The instructor for this course will serve as their advisor. Topics will include applying for summer research positions, studying for chemistry exams, an introduction to scientific literature, developing resilience s they face challenges in becoming independent learners, and balancing leadership, service and academic commitments. Prerequisite or Corequisite: 125. Fall.

116 Introductory Chemistry Topics 2.  (0 or 1)
A continuation of Introductory Chemistry Topics 1. This course will be required of all students participating in the FoCuS program. The instructor for this course will serve as their advisor. Topics will include applying for summer research positions, studying for chemistry exams, an introduction to scientific literature, developing resilience as they face challenges in becoming independent learners, and balancing leadership, service and academic commitments. Prerequisite: 115. Spring.

121 Skills in Chemistry. (2)
This course will help students develop the visualization, problem solving, and critical thinking skills necessary for success in CHEM 125. Students will work in small groups in a student-centered learning environment that will provide support as they address some of the challenging concepts in chemical structure and properties. The course content will be coordinated closely with the first half of CHEM 125 and will be scheduled to run parallel to it. The course is intended for students who have been identified as likely benefiting from this experience.  Must also register for CHEM 125.

125 Introduction to Chemical Structure and Properties. (4)
And introductory chemistry course in which students study how the structure of atoms, ions, and molecules determine their physical and chemical properties.  Starting with atoms and their electron configurations, students build a progressive and linked understanding of bonding, ionic and molecular geometry, and physical and chemical properties that emerge from structure.  Intended as a first course for students majoring in the natural sciences.  Prerequisite: ACT Math Score 23, SAT Math Score 575 or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 121.

201  Purification and Separation Lab 1. (0,1).
An introductory laboratory course in basic purification techniques and analysis in chemistry.  Emphasis is on mastery of technique and analysis of experimental data  Students usually coenroll in CHEM 125 and 201. However, students may withdraw from either one during the semester and take that course in a subsequent semester. Students who take CHEM 121 and CHEM 125 in the same semester should take CHEM 201 lab in the following semester.
Students must complete both CHEM 125 and CHEM 201 in order to earn the NS designation.
If a student only completes CHEM 125 they will not earn the NS designation for the Common Curriculum.
If a student only completes CHEM 201 they will not earn the NS designation for the Common Curriculum.

 202 Purification and Chromatography Lab 2. (0 or 1)
A laboratory course in the use of chromatography as a tool to purify and analyze chemistry mixtures. Emphasis is on mastery of techniques and analysis of experimental data. Prerequisite: CHEM 201.
If a student only completes CHEM 125 they will not earn the NS designation for the Common Curriculum.
If a student only completes CHEM 201 they will not earn the NS designation for the Common Curriculum.

203 Synthesis Lab. (0 or 1)
A laboratory course focusing on synthesis techniques in inorganic, organic and biochemistry. Emphasis is on mastery of techniques and analysis of experimental data.

205 Measurement Lab. (0 or 1)
A laboratory introduction to the science of chemical measurement. Using classical techniques (quantitative analysis, spectroscopic techniques) students will learn to measure important physical and chemical properties, quantitate and minimize measurement errors, and obtain accurate calibrations. Laboratory experiments will focus on student development of precision and accuracy, data analysis and reporting as well as scientific writing. Prerequisite: CHEM 201.

234 General Chemistry II. (4)
Topics include intermolecular forces, kinetics, chemical equilibria (especially solubilities and acid-base systems), thermodynamics and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory emphasis is on illustration of chemical principles, development of technique, quantitative measurement and data analysis. Prerequisite: 123. Spring.  This course will not be offered after Spring 2013.

235 Organic Chemistry I. (4)
A systematic study of organic molecules and functional groups. Topics include nomenclature, bonding, molecular structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms and current spectroscopic techniques. Laboratory emphasis is on purification, identification and elementary synthesis. Prerequisite: 234. Fall.  This course will not be offered after Fall 2011.

236 Organic Chemistry II. (4)
Areas included are completion of the systematic study of organic functional groups, heterocyclic chemistry, natural products chemistry and multi-step organic synthesis. Laboratory emphasis is on multi-step synthesis and spectroscopic analysis. Prerequisite: 235. Spring. This course will not be offered after Spring 2012.

250 Reactions of Nucleophiles and Electrophiles (Reactivity 1). (4)
An understanding of chemical reactivity is developed based on principles of Lewis acidity and basicity. The formation, stability and reactivity of coordination complexes serves as an introduction to electrophilicity, nucleophilicity, and steric and electronic effects. Investigations of carbonyl reactivity (addition and substitution) using analogous principles are used to develop pattern recognition skills in understanding chemical processes. Some emphasis is placed on energetics as a basis of understanding reactivity. Together, these topics lead to an understanding of simple biochemical pathways. Applications of the material are drawn from organic, biological and inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 125.

251 Intermediate Reactions of Nucleophiles and Electrophiles (Reactivity 2). (4)
An understanding of chemical reactivity, initiated in Reactivity 1, is further developed based on principles of Lewis acidity and basicity. Alternative mechanisms of ligand substitution in coordination complexes are considered in terms of steric and electronic effects. An understanding of kinetic evidence is developed in order to determine which mechanism has occurred in a particular case. Organic nucleophilic substitution pathways are studied using analgous principles. Electrophilic addition and substitution in pi systems (alkenes and aromatics) are used to extend these principles to new systems and complete an overview of polar reactions. Applications of the material are drawn from organic, biological and inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 250.

255 Macroscopic Chemical Analysis (4)
Use of statistical and thermodynamic approaches to develop understanding of analytical and physical techniques and theory. Emphasis on free energy as the driving force for chemical reactions will be explored through the study of chemical equilibriums in simple and complex systems. Statistical methods will be developed for the assessment of data and prediction of system change. The laws of thermodynamics will be applied to chemical systems in equilibrium as well as in dynamic situations. Prerequisite: CHEM 125.

271 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

305 Integrated lab (4) 
Students will conduct multiple cross-discipline and open-ended projects that will include components of experimental design, method development, synthesis, separation, instrumental analysis, molecular modeling, quantitative data analysis and written/oral presentations of lab results and discussions.  This lab replaces all those previously attached to Junior and Senior level upper division courses in our old curriculum.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 201, 202, 203, and 205;  Corequisite: CHEM 315, 318.

315 Advanced Reactions (Reactivity 3). (4)
An understanding of chemical reactivity, developed in Reactivity 1 and 2, is extended to non-polar systems through the study of redox, radical, photochemical and pericyclic reactions.  Molecular orbital theory is exploited to explain a number of reactions. With a firm understanding of an array of reactions in hand, a number of applications, including biochemical pathways such as oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis, are examined in detail. The roles of enzyme catalysis, enzyme cofactors and regulatory pathways are also explored. Prerequisite: CHEM 251.

318 Microscopic Chemical Analysis (pending approval). (4)
Exploration of chemical systems from a quantum mechanical perspective. Spectroscopy will be emphasized as one of the techniques that link theory with data. Statistical methods will be developed for the assessment of instrumentation as well as a fundamental understanding of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques used in the analysis and exploration of chemical properties. Prerequisite: CHEM 255; Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 120; PHYS 106.

321-326 Topics in Chemistry. (1-4)
The Chemistry Department offers a series of topics courses, 321-326. These courses, offered for variable credit, cover the major areas in chemistry and are used to extend or supplement topics introduced in previous chemistry courses.
 321 Topics in Computational Chemistry. (1-4)
 322 Topics in Analytical Chemistry. (1-4)
 323 Topics in Biochemistry. (1-4)
 324 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (1-4)
 325 Topics in Organic Chemistry. (1-4)
 326 Topics in Physical Chemistry. (1-4)

333 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics. (4)
Topics include the principles of thermodynamics applied to chemical systems, kinetic molecular theory, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory emphasis is on chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, and computer refinement of data. Prerequisites: 236, 8 credits of physics, MATH 120. Fall.  This course will not be offered after Fall 2013.

334 Quantum Chemistry and Structure of Matter. (4)
Topics include quantum theory of atomic and molecular systems, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and statistical thermodynamics. Laboratory emphasis is on computational quantum chemistry and analysis of spectroscopic data. Prerequisites: 236, 8 credits in physics, MATH 120. Spring. This course will not be offered after Spring 2013.

335 Analytical Chemistry. (4)
A study of the theories and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Emphasis is on the kinds of chemical problems that can be explored using quantitative methods of analysis. Problem solving and quantitative reasoning skills are used to: 1) design appropriate experiments, 2) acquire and analyze data and 3) assess errors. The laboratory focuses on the separation and analysis of multi-component systems. Prerequisite: 234. Fall.  This course will not be offered after Fall 2013.

336 Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (4)
Modern theory and techniques with emphasis on instrumentation. Topics include electrolysis, pulse polarography, spectrophotometry, flame techniques and chromatography. Laboratory emphasis is on polarographic methods, advanced spectrophotometric techniques, HPLC and GC, atomic absorption and computer interfacing to instruments. Prerequisites: 335, PHYS 105 or 191. Spring. This course will not be offered after Spring 2014.

341 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (4)
Topics include periodicity, advanced bonding theories (particularly as applied to inorganic systems), main group elements, solid state chemistry, coordination compounds, organometallic compounds and catalysis. Laboratory emphasis is on the synthesis, characterization and reactivity of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: 333 or 334. Spring. This course will not be offered after Spring 2014.

349 Chemistry in Experience and Practice. (0-1)
Students in their junior and senior years will participate in and write reflections about structured activities designed to explore jobs, graduate education, research, and general career options in chemistry. Students must enroll in Fall of their junior year. Students will receive a grade in their senior year. Required for Chemistry majors.   

360 Senior Capstone Research. (2-4)
Capstone library research (2) or laboratory research (2-4) done under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Students receiving ACS certification or selecting a concentration in Chemical Biology, Environmental Chemistry of Materials/Industrial Chemistry require 4 credits of CHEM 360.  Required for all chemistry majors except those completing HONR 398 (Honors Senior Research) which fulfills the research and capstone requirement.  Students also attend regular class meetings focusing on their research progress, literature review, and preparation of a final paper and oral presentation given at the end of their senior year. Although students may register for the course in the Fall and/or Spring semesters of their senior year, the must select an advisor and sign a research contract in the beginning of their senior year.  A grade is given after the final presentation and paper. Satisfies the Experiential Learning requirement of the Common Curriculum.

371 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

398 Honors Senior Essay, Research or Creative Project. (4)
Required for graduation with "Distinction in Chemistry." Prerequisite: HONR 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see HONR 398.

XXX Chemistry Comprehensive Exam. (0)
Required for graduation with a chemistry or biochemistry major. Spring.

Possible two credit, half-semester classes offered starting Fall 2013:

Course descriptions for a series of 2 credit in-depth classes are given below.  In-depth courses do not require completion of all the foundation courses as indicated by the specified prerequisite course(s).    

CHEM XXX: Bioanalytical Chemistry
This course provides an overview of the physico-chemical principles of bioanalytic methods and the application of modern instrumental techniques to biological systems. Particular focus will be placed on fundamental principles and analytical measurements of biomolecules, immunoassays, separations, biological mass spectrometry, microscopy and imaging. Emerging technologies such as nanotechnology-enabled biosensors, microfluidic devices and lab-on-chip will also be addressed. Error analysis, statistical treatment of data and validation of bioanalytical methods and devices are included. Prerequisite:  CHEM 255 or CHEM 205

CHEM XXX: Chemical Biology
This course will cover topics of current interest in chemical biology and will survey the way in which organic chemistry is used to investigate and manipulate biological systems either for a biological or chemical purpose. Specific topics will depend on class interest but may include protein design, development of unnatural biological molecules, peptide-carbohydrate interactions, combinatorial synthesis/libraries, molecular recognition, chemical genetics, biosynthesis and methods of drug discovery. Prerequisite: CHEM 315

CHEM XXX: Chemistry of Industrial Topics
This course is intended to teach students the underlying principles in the operation and process development of a product for industrial scale mass production.  Topics for this course will include testing/trials, production design, and resource management. Prerequisite:  CHEM 318

CHEM XXX: Environmental Chemistry
Chemistry has played a major role in the advancement of society and in making our lives longer, healthier, more comfortable and more enjoyable.  The effects of human-make chemicals are ubiquitous and in many instances quite positive.  However, along with all the positive advances that result from chemistry, copious amounts of toxic and corrosive chemicals have also been produced and dispersed into the environment.  During this course, you will see that scientists do have a good handle on many environmental chemistry problems and have suggested ways to keep us from inheriting uncontrolled experiments on the planet.  The course will look at five areas of environmental study; atmospheric chemistry and air pollution, energy and climate change, toxic organic compounds, water chemistry and water pollution, and metals, soils sediments and waste disposal.  Prerequisites: Chem 318. Co-requisite, Chem XXX (Advanced Separations)

 

CHEM XXX: Material/Nano Chemistry
This course will focus on the fundamental principles in developing products for industry.  These products will include structural materials, conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.  The students will be presented with current synthetic techniques for the production of bulk and nanostructured materials along with analytical methodologies to physically characterize synthesized products for a desired application. Prerequisite: CHEM 318

CHEM XXX: Retrosynthetic Analysis/Synthesis
Synthesis is an important application of chemical reactivity concepts.  In this course, students will learn about some current methods useful in synthesis and see these methods applied in the synthesis of complex molecules. Topics may include organo-transition metal reactions, methods of enantioselective synthesis and retrosynthetic analysis.  Students will demonstrate basic proficiency in these areas and also carry out detailed analyses of total syntheses from the current literature. Prerequisite: CHEM 315

CHEM XXX: Advanced Mechanistic Determinations
This course will study the factors that affect the rates of organic, inorganic and biochemical reactions.  Emphasis will be on methods for monitoring reaction rates and using experimental data to propose reaction mechanisms.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 315.


CHEM XXX:  Bioinorganic Chemistry
This course explores the role of metals in biological systems.  Emphasis will be on metalloproteins, their synthetic models and spectroscopic techniques used to probe these systems.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 315

CHEM XXX: Catalysis
This course will involve the use of metal surfaces, discrete organic and organometallic compounds and biomolecules as catalysts.  Emphasis will be on understanding how the catalyst functions and how it is studied and modified to alter its selectivity and efficiency.  Prerequisite: CHEM 315

CHEM XXX: Drug Design/ Medicinal Chemistry
This course will explore structure based drug design. Specific topics will depend on class interest but may include structure activity relationships, computational drug design methods, drug delivery, combinatorial chemistry, drug metabolism and drug synthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 315

CHEM XXX: Structure Elucidation
The major emphasis of this course will be on molecular structure determination.   This skill is essential for chemists in many areas, such as medicinal chemistry, process chemistry, natural products chemistry, polymer chemistry, forensic chemistry, and many other sub-specialties of analytical chemistry.  This course will prepare students with an up-to-date presentation of the tools used for the advanced analysis and structure elucidation of organic molecules using a variety of spectroscopic data including mass spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, fluorimetry, x-ray spectroscopy, etc.  The specific techniques may vary depending on instructor choice.   However, as NMR has proven to be one of the most powerful tools available, this course will provide students with an understanding of the basic principles of NMR and the students will explore the use of different techniques such as decoupling, relaxation time measurements, nOe, and interpretation of 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Prerequisite: CHEM 203

CHEM XXX: Advanced Separation Techniques (Science)
This course is primarily focused on the basic theory of separation processes, separation techniques, and specific separation methods as applied to chemical, environmental and biological samples. Modern separation techniques such as various types of chromatography, electrophoresis and field flow fractionation will be covered. Multidimensional separation techniques and hyphenated techniques will also be discussed. Prerequisite:  CHEM 255, CHEM 205

CHEM XXX: Biophysical Chemistry
A study of thermodynamic and kinetic process underlying biological molecule structure and activity.  Special attention will be given to structures of multimolecular aggregates and conformations of proteins, nucleic acids, and complex carbohydrates, the hydrodynamic and spectroscopic techniques used to study them, and kinetic analyses that described biomolecule interactions and reactivity. Prerequisite:  CHEM 255 or 205

CHEM XXX: Instrument Design
This course will include a critical examination of the process of measurement and then the systematic treatment of instrument design and some discussion of instrumental methods.  Substantial amount of physical theory of electronics, optics and quantification will be included to provide background on how an instrument operates, the overall performance, limitations and selection of instrument modules that will yield desired measurements.  Basic design of spectrometers and electrochemical modules will be covered. Prerequisites: PHYS 106 or 200, CHEM 318

CHEM XXX: Toxicology/Metabolism
This course will explore biological mechanisms of activation and detoxification of xenobiotics. Topics will include oxidation/ reduction mechanisms (i.e. Cytochrome P450, Flavin Mono-Oxygenase), transferase reactions (i.e. Glutathione S-Transferase, Glycosyltransferases, Acetyltransferases), adduct formation, and repair mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 315

CHEM XXX: Symmetry, Orbitals and Spectroscopy
This course will involve the study and application of symmetry, group theory and quantum mechanics to spectroscopy and molecular orbital theory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 318

CHEM XXX:  Metabolic, Energy and Signal Transduction

:  This course will use thermodynamic, kinetic, analytical, reactivity and systems approaches to study the coordinate control of biological processes involved in metabolism, and energy and signal transduction.    Prerequisites:  CHEM 251 and 25