Saint John's School of Theology - Seminary

Dean: William Cahoy

Rector: Michael Patella OSB

Associate Dean of Faculty: Michael Patella OSB

Associate Dean of Administration: Jeffrey Kaster

Associate Dean of Ministerial Formation and Outreach: Barbara Sutton

Faculty: Charles Bobertz, Kathleen Cahalan, William Cahoy, Martin Connell, Katherine Lilla Cox, Miguel Diaz, Luke Dysinger OSB, Bernard Evans, Carolyn Finley, Daniel Finn, Mary Forman OSB, Kim Kasling, Jeffrey Kaster, Patricia Kent, Dale Launderville OSB, Daniel McKanan, Irene Nowell OSB, Michael Patella OSB, Anthony Ruff OSB, Don Saliers, Columba Stewart OSB, Barbara Sutton, Axel Theimer

The School of Theology•Seminary of Saint John's University, founded by Benedictines in 1857, offers a Master of Divinity degree and Master of Arts degrees in Theology, Pastoral Ministry, Liturgical Studies and Liturgical Music. The school's curriculum includes programs in Rural Ministry and Monastic Studies. A sabbatical program, certificate program, Holy Land Studies and Early Christian World program, Life Long Learning program and Youth in Theology and Ministry program are also available.

Mission

Saint John's School of Theology•Seminary, rooted in the Roman Catholic and Benedictine traditions and the ecumenical and liturgical heritage of Saint John's Abbey, fosters study and prayer in a community of learners.

As a community of faith and hope, we, the faculty, staff, and students of Saint John’s School of Theology•Seminary, worship God and celebrate the life, death, and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit.

As an academic community relying on the wisdom of the same Holy Spirit, we root ourselves in the Christine tradition, and interpret that legacy in light of the Roman Catholic and Benedictine heritage passed on to us by Saint John’s Abbey with its rich theological, liturgical, and ecumenical history. We commit ourselves to academic, spiritual, pastoral, and professional formation so we might serve the Church in lay and ordained ministry and thus use our diverse gifts for the transformation of our world. We dedicate ourselves to a life-long pursuit of wisdom so we might progress in Christian faith and “run on the path of God’s commandments, our hearts expanding with the inexpressible delight of love” (Prologue, RB).

Graduate theology courses

Courses in the 400s, listed below, are designed for students in the theology programs of the School of Theology•Seminary. Undergraduates may register for them with the permission of the instructor, chair of the CSB/SJU theology department and of the dean of the School of Theology•Seminary. Courses in the 500s are open only to students in the School of Theology•Seminary.

For more information about the School of Theology•Seminary and the courses listed below, write for a copy of the school's academic catalog to: Director of Enrollment, Saint John's School of Theology•Seminary, Saint John's University, Collegeville, MN 56321-7288, or call 320-363-2896.

General Areas

THY 402  Introduction to Christian Tradition I (3)
THY 404  Introduction to Christian Tradition II (3)
THY 467  Consortium (0)
THY 468  Consortium (3)
THY 580  Thesis (6)
THY 599  Comprehensive Examination (0)

Old Testament

SSOT 400 Reading the Old Testament (3)
SSOT 401  Biblical Hebrew (3)
SSOT 406  Biblical History and Sites (3)
SSOT 410  Pentateuch (3)
SSOT 412  Prophetic Tradition (3)
SSOT 414  Wisdom Tradition (3)
SSOT 416  Psalms (3)
SSOT 468  Topics in Old Testament Literature (1-3)
SSOT 469  Topics in Jewish Biblical Theology (1-3)
SSOT 470  Independent Study (1-3)

New Testament

SSNT 400  Reading the New Testament (3)
SSNT 401 New Testament Greek I (3)
SSNT 402 New Testament Greek II (3)
SSNT 406 Early Christian World (3)
SSNT 417 Gospel of Matthew (3)
SSNT 418 Gospel of Mark (3)
SSNT 419  Gospel of Luke (3)
SSNT 420 Gospels (3)
SSNT 422 Pauline Letters (3)
SSNT 424 Johannine Tradition (3)
SSNT 468 Topics in New Testament Literature (1-3)
SSNT 470 Independent Study (1-3)

Systematic/Doctrinal Theology

DOCT 406  Christology (3)
DOCT 407  Trinity, Faith and Revelation (3)
DOCT 408  Ecclesiology (3)
DOCT 411  Christian Anthropology (3)
DOCT 413  Theology of Lay and Ordained Ministry (3)
DOCT 414  Eschatology (3)
DOCT 419  Mariology (3)
DOCT 424  Theology of Sacraments and Worship (3)
DOCT 468  Topics in Doctrinal Theology (1-3)
DOCT 470  Independent Study (1-3)

Moral Theology

MORL 421  Fundamental Moral Theology (3)
MORL 422  Christian Social Ethics (3)
MORL 428  Survey of Moral Issues (3)
MORL 456  Rural Social Issues (3)
MORL 468  Topics in Moral Theology (1-3)
MORL 470  Independent Study (1-3)

History and Historical Theology

HHTH 400  Patristics (3)
HHTH 403  Medieval Church (452-1500) (3)
HHTH 408  Being Christian in America (3)
HHTH 412  Reformation, Modernity, Global Church (3)
HHTH 413  Monastic History I: Pre-Benedict (3)
HHTH 415  Monastic History II: Benedict to the Reformation (3)
HHTH 417  Monastic History III: Reformation to the Present (3)
HHTH 424  History of Christian Spirituality I (3)
HHTH 425 History of Christian Spirituality II (3)
HHTH 426  History of Judaism (3)
HHTH 428 History of Christian Spirituality III (3)
HHTH 468  Topics in Church History (1-3)
HHTH 469  Topics in the History of Doctrine (1-3)
HHTH 470  Independent Study (1-3)

Liturgical Studies

LTGY 400  History and Sources of Liturgy (3)
LTGY 404  Rites of Christian Initiation (3)
LTGY 406  Eucharistic Liturgy/Theology (3)
LTGY 411  Rites of Reconciliation (2)
LTGY 413  Rites for the Sick (2)
LTGY 415  Rites of Christian Burial (1)
LTGY 417  Rites of Ordination (1)
LTGY 419  Rites of Christian Marriage (1)
LTGY 421  Liturgical Year (3)
LTGY 423  Liturgy of the Hours (3)
LTGY 424  Theology of Sacraments and Worship (3)
LTGY 467  Topics in Jewish Worship (1-3)
LTGY 468  Topics in Liturgical Studies (1-3)
LTGY 470  Independent Study (1-3)

Liturgical Music

LMUS 407  Applied Organ (0-2)
LMUS 408  Applied Voice (0-2)
LMUS 410 Gregorian Chant I (1)
LMUS 411 Gregorian Chant II (1)
LMUS 421  Psalmody/Hymnody (3)
LMUS 431  Advanced Choral Conducting (3)
LMUS 433  Service Playing (0-1)
LMUS 435  Service Leadership for the Cantor/Song Leader (0-1)
LMUS 439  Practicum (1-2)
LMUS 468  Topics in Liturgical Music (1-3)
LMUS 468  Final Project in Liturgical Music (1-2)
LMUS 501  Seminar in Liturgical Music Techniques and Literature (3)

Monastic Studies

MONS 402  Monastic History I: Pre-Benedict (3)
MONS 404  Monastic History II: Benedict to the Reformation (3)
MONS 406  Monastic History III: Reformation to the Present (3)
MONS 408 Contemporary Monasticism (3)
MONS 410  Rule of Benedict (3)
MONS 412  Monastic Structures (1)
MONS 421  Monastic Liturgy (3)
MONS 423  Monastic Formation (3)
MONS 434  Monastic Spiritual Theology (3)
MONS 435  Christian Asceticism (3)
MONS 436  Bible and Prayer (3)
MONS 437 Desert Ammas (3)
MONS 468  Topics in Monastic Studies (1-3)
MONS 470  Independent Study (1-3)

Spiritual Theology

SPIR 424  History of Christian Spirituality I (3)
SPIR 425  History of Christian Spirituality II (3)
SPIR 426  History of Christian Spirituality III (3)
SPIR 430  Theology and Spirituality (3)
SPIR 431  Christian Prayer (3)
SPIR 432  Spirituality and Mysticism (3)
SPIR 434  Monastic Spiritual Theology (3)
SPIR 435  Christian Asceticism (3)
SPIR 436  Bible and Prayer (3)
SPIR 467  Topics in Jewish Spirituality (1-3)
SPIR 468  Topics in Spirituality (1-3)
SPIR 470  Independent Study (1-3)

Pastoral Theology and Ministry

PTHM 401 Evangelization and Catechesis (3)
PTHM 402 Youth Ministry (3)
PTHM 405 Introduction to Pastoral Ministry (3)
PTHM 408 Introduction to Pastoral Care (3)
PTHM 411 Leadership in the Christian Community (3)
PTHM 412 Basic Clinical Pastoral Education (3)
PTHM 413 Theology of Lay and Ordained Ministry (3)
PTHM 417 Homiletics (3)
PTHM 418 Dynamics of Spiritual Direction (3)
PTHM 419 Advanced Spiritual Direction (1-3)
PTHM 420 Introduction to Ecclesiastical Law (3)
PTHM 422 Matrimonial Jurisprudence (2-3)
PTHM 425 Pastoral Liturgy I (3)
PTHM 427 Pastoral Liturgy II (3)
PTHM 450 Parish Administration (3)
PTHM 451 Ministry Through the Life Cycle (3)
PTHM 456 Rural Social Issues (3)
PTHM 457 Sacramental Catechesis (3)
PTHM 458 Social Ministry (3)
PTHM 459 Practicum in Pastoral Ministry (1-6)
PTHM 462 Internship (1-6)
PTHM 465  Integration Seminar (3)
PTHM 468  Topics in Pastoral Theology (1-3)
PTHM 470  Independent Study (1-3)

Course Descriptions

Interdisciplinary and General Areas
THY 402 Introduction to the Christian Tradition I. (3)
An introductory survey of the Christian theological tradition studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 BCE to 1650). Figures and issues will be situated within the philosophical and theological currents of their time.

THY 404 Introduction to the Christian Tradition II. (3)
An introductory survey of the Christian theological tradition studying representative texts from the Enlightenment to the modern age (1650 to present day). Figures and issues will be situated within the philosophical and theological currents of their time. 

THY 467 Consortium. (0)
Registration for students from Bethel Theological Seminary, Saint Paul Seminary at the University of St. Thomas, Luther Seminary, or United Theological Seminary who are taking classes at Saint John's.

THY 468 Consortium. (3)
Registration for Saint John's students who are taking classes at Bethel Theological Seminary, Saint Paul Seminary at the University of St. Thomas, Luther Seminary, or United Theological Seminary. For more information, see the School of Theology•Seminary Student Handbook.

THY 580 Thesis. (6)

THY 599 Comprehensive Examination. (0)

Scripture
Old Testament

SSOT 400 Reading the Old Testament. (3)
The Israelites forged their identity as a people and sustained their common bonds through interaction and communication with YHWH. This course will examine the testimony of the Old Testament to this relational dynamic between YHWH, the people, and their leaders through the exegesis of representative texts from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Writings.

SSOT 401 Biblical History and Sites. (3)
Survey of Israel's history in the context of the geography and archeology of the Holy Land. Field trips give thorough acquaintance with the land from Dan to Beersheba. Offered in the Holy Land.

SSOT 404 History of Israel. (2)
A survey of the key events and persons during the time of the patriarchs, the exodus and conquest, the monarchy, the exile and the restoration.

SSOT 410 Pentateuch. (3)
Survey of the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy in the Hebrew Bible, introducing the student to their content, the traditions of interpretation and the methods employed in their exegesis. Themes of creating, liberating, and covenanting are emphasized.

SSOT 412 Prophetic Tradition. (3)
Survey of the writings of the prophets in the Old Testament with special attention given to the historical contexts of the biblical prophets and the language, genres, images, and theological content of various prophetic texts. Further consideration of the relevance of the prophetic mesage in contemporary church and society.

SSOT 414 Wisdom Tradition. (3)
Introduction to the wisdom material of the Old Testament with special attention given to the historical background of the wisdom tradition, and the structure and content of the wisdom books (especially Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth, Sirach and Wisdom), the development of the OT wisdom tradition in later writings including the New Testament, and the relevance of the wisdom tradition to the present.

SSOT 416 Psalms. (1-3)
Study of the backbone of Jewish and Christian prayer for three thousand years. In addition to the exegesis of selected psalms, topics include: the formation of the Psalter, various translations, the spirituality of the psalms, and the use of the psalms in Christian prayer, especially the Eucharist and the Liturgy of the Hours.

SSOT 468 Topics in Old Testament Literature. (1-3)

SSOT 469 Topics in Jewish Biblical Theology. (3)

SSOT 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

New Testament
SSNT 400 Reading the New Testament. (3)
A general introduction to the history, literature and theology of the New Testament with special emphasis on reading the strategies appropriate to both pastoral work and further academic study. Particular attention is paid to the Gospels and the Pauline Letters.

SSNT 401 New Testament Greek I. (3)
The elements of New Testament Greek, with emphasis on reading comprehension with the aid of a dictionary. The study of grammar and its practical application in reading New Testament texts.

SSNT 402 New Testament Greek II. (3)
Continuation of SSNT 401, with particular focus on New Testament texts as primary translation sources.

SSNT 406 History and Geography of the Early Christian World. (3)
A study of the artistic, cultural, and social foundations of Christianity through visits to many of the locales in various parts of Greece and Turkey mentioned in the Pauline writings and the Book of Revelation. Early Christian and monastic sites included. Exploration of how one historical age influences another and the importance that art and archeology play in theology and religion. Offered in various locales in Italy, Greece, and Turkey.

SSNT 417 Gospel of Matthew. (3)
Extensive investigation of the Gospel of Matthew within its theological, social, and historical context.

SSNT 418 Gospel of Mark. (3)
A theological, historical and literary analysis of the second Gospel. Special emphasis is placed on the narrative quality of Mark and its relationship to the early Christian community.

SSNT 419 Gospel of Luke. (3)
A study of the major themes of the Lucan corpus through an historical critical examination of selected passages. Special attention will be given to Luke's soteriology.

SSNT 420 Gospels. (3)
A study of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, their history, literary style, and theological vision. Emphasis on hermeneutical questions, text formation, and the interrelation of the four books in forming a unified Gospel tradition.

SSNT 422 The Pauline Letters. (3)
A theological, historical and literary analysis of the Pauline letters. Topics may include the conversion and mission of Paul, the historical situation of the Pauline communities, the literary and rhetorical quality of the letters and major theological themes.

SSNT 424 The Johannine Tradition. (3)
Extensive investigation of the Johannine corpus within its theological, social and historical context.

SSNT 468 Topics in New Testament Literature. (1-3)

SSNT 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

Systematics

Doctrinal Theology
DOCT 406 Christology. (3)
Understandings of the person, presence and mission of Christ in scripture, in doctrine and dogma, and in contemporary theology.

DOCT 407 Trinity, Faith and Revelation. (3)
This course explores the emergence and development of the doctrine of the Trinity. The doctrine of the Trinity represents the Christian way of naming the mystery of God, how this mystery is shared in history, and the pastoral/practical consequences that follow as a result of this sharing. The course surveys the biblical, philosophical, sociological, and theological landscape that has contributed to this doctrine from early Christianity to contemporary times. 

DOCT 408 Ecclesiology. (3)
This course examines the nature and structure of the Roman Catholic Church from its apostolic origins to the present. Various models used in understanding the Church will be studied (e.g. the Church as communion, the Church as sacrament, etc.) The local and universal nature of the Church, and issues related to magisterium, authority, evangelization, ministry, and missiology will be discussed.

DOCT 411 Christian Anthropology. (3)
This course undertakes a Christian exploration to the question: What does it mean to be human? As a theological discipline, Christian theological anthropology draws from a wide range of sources. These sources include the doctrine of creation, the doctrine of sin and grace, the doctrine of the Trinity, Christology, ecclesiology, and eschatology. This course examines these sources and underscores the historical evolution of Christian theological anthropology.

DOCT 413  Theology of Lay and Ordained Ministry. (3) 
Students study the biblical foundations, historical development, systematic theology, and canonical structures of ordained and lay ministry in the Church. Cross-listed with PTHM 413.

DOCT 414 Eschatology. (3)
Eschatological dimensions of the Christian experience.

DOCT 419 Mariology. (3)
Scriptural, Christological and ecclesiological bases of the Church's view of Mary. The development of Marian devotions and their place in the history of spirituality and in contemporary spiritual life.

DOCT 424 Theology of Sacraments and Worship. (3)
The roots of Christian worship in human myth, symbol, ritual and celebration. The historical development of sacramental life in the Church and theological reflection upon it. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament especially in relation to Christology and ecclesiology. Cross-listed with LTGY 424.

DOCT 468 Topics in Doctrinal Theology. (1-3)

DOCT 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

Moral Theology
MORL 421 Fundamental Moral Theology. (3)
This course covers the foundations of the Christian moral life and of Christian moral decision making. The fundamental themes to be covered include, but are not limited to: freedom, conscience formation and moral agency, moral normativity, what constitutes moral reasoning, the use of scripture, tradition and natural law in moral decisions, the interplay between sin and grace, virtue ethics, and the ecclesial aspect of moral decisions.

MORL 422 Christian Social Ethics. (3)
The implications of Christian faith and theological reflection for contemporary society. The social dimensions of biblical ethics and the social teachings of the Catholic Church.

MORL 428 Survey of Moral Issues. (3)
This course examines how the application of fundamental moral themes informs particular issues of Christian morality. Particular issues potentially covered fall under the global nature of moral theology, life and death, sexuality, biomedical ethics, ethics of pastoral ministry, and the intersection of church and state.

MORL 456 Rural Social Issues. (3)
An examination of major social issues affecting rural America, the social justice dimensions of these issues, and their implications for ministry in the Church. Cross-listed with PTHM 456.

MORL 468 Topics in Moral Theology. (1-3)

MORL 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

History and Historical Theology
HHTH 400 Patristics. (3)
Survey of church history from the apostolic age to the Council of Chalcedon in 451, with special emphasis on the Apostolic Fathers, the Christianization of the Roman Empire, and the formation of Christian doctrine.

HHTH 402 Medieval Church (452-1500). (3)
Survey of church history from the age of Benedict to the eve of the Reformation. Topics will include the Christianization of northern and western Europe, the development of monastic and mendicant religious orders, scholastic theology, medieval heresy, spirituality and mysticism, the Christian art and literature of the Middle Ages, and the role of the papacy in crating a united “Christendom.”

HHTH 404 Reformation, Modernity, Global Church. (3)
Survey of church history from the age of Luther to the present. This course will introduce students to the historical dynamics that transformed the united “Christendom” of the Middle Ages into a diverse and truly global twenty-first century church.

HHTH 406 Being Christian in America. (3)
Historical and cultural survey of Christianity in America. This course offers students a deeper understanding of the religious dynamics of American culture, allowing them both to recognize the seeds of the gospel in America and to offer prophetic critiques of American culture.

HHTH 413 Monastic History: Pre-Benedict. (3)
The rise of monasticism within the early church of East and West to the time of Benedict. Cross-listed with MONS 402.

HHTH 415 Monastic History: Benedict to the Reformation. (3)
The development of Western monastic life and reform movements from the early middle ages through the fifteenth century. Cross-listed with MONS 404.

HHTH 417 Monastic History: Reformation to the Present. (3)
The decline of Western monasticism in the sixteenth century through its revival in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Cross-listed with MONS 406.

HHTH 424 The History of Christian Spirituality I. (3)
An exploration of the significant formative elements, experiences and writers of Christian spirituality in its first seven hundred years. Cross-listed with SPIR 424.

HHTH 425 History of Christian Spirituality II. (3)
A study of the Christian spirituality of the Middle Ages, especially from the end of the seventh century to the Reformation. Special attention will be given to notable figures, writings, events, institutions and movements that shaped the expression of Christian convictions and practice, up to the dawn of the "modern" period. Cross-listed with SPIR 425.

HHTH 426 The History of Judaism. (3)
Significant persons and movements in the development of Judaism.

HHTH 428 History of Christian Spirituality III. (3)
The development of Christian spirituality from the Protestant and Catholic Reformations to the present. Also included will be events in Asia, Africa, North and Latin America. Cross-listed with SPIR 426.

HHTH 468 Topics in Church History. (1-3)

HHTH 469 Topics in the History of Doctrine. (1-3)

HHTH 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

Liturgical Studies
LTGY 400 History and Sources of the Liturgy. (3)
Survey of the history of Christian rites in Eastern and Western traditions, from New Testament to the present using primary texts. Basic introduction to the methodologies of liturgical studies and to disciplines related to the study of worship.

LTGY 404 Rites of Christian Initiation. (3)
Study of the theology and history of Christian initiation in Eastern and Western traditions, including the rites of the catechumenate, baptism, annointing, and first eucharist. Contemporary reforms in the churches, with special emphasis on the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

LTGY 406 Eucharistic Liturgy and Theology. (3)
The origins of the Eucharistic liturgy and its historical development. Theological and doctrinal perspectives. Examination of the postconciliar Roman rite and its attendant documents. Issues in contemporary pastoral practice.

LTGY 411 Rites of Reconciliation. (2)
The multiple modes of reconciliation in the Christian Church. Development of the process and rituals of reconciliation and of the sacrament of penance and their relation to the Eucharist. Contemporary rites of reconciliation in the Roman Catholic and other churches.

LTGY 413 Rites for the Sick. (2)
Christian theology of illness and the pastoral care of the sick with primary emphasis on the evolution of the sacrament of anointing and praying for the sick. Today's rites for the sick in the Roman rite and in other traditions.

LTGY 415 Rites of Christian Burial. (1)
Changing Christian customs in aid of the dying and the bereaved. The development of liturgies of burial chiefly in the West. Ritual patterns of burial in today's churches and the modern funeral industry.

LTGY 417 Rites of Ordination. (1)
The liturgical tradition of ordained ministry in the early Church and later Western Church. Ordination rites today in relation to non-ordained ministries whether recognized or emerging.

LTGY 419 Rites of Christian Marriage. (1)
The appearance of Christian customs and rites within social patterns of betrothal and marriage. The Roman rite and shifting theology of marriage as sacrament. Tensions between rite, sacrament and the popular culture of weddings.

LTGY 421 Liturgical Year. (3)
The interaction of time-keeping and faith in Christianity. Theology of Sunday, Easter and its seasons, Christmas-Epiphany and their seasons, with study of the prayers for the seasons and feasts in a variety of liturgical books and calendars today. Liturgical time and the rhythms of modern life.

LTGY 423 Liturgy of the Hours. (2-3)
The Liturgy of the Hours historically and theologically considered. An analysis of the origins and evolution of the Office in the patristic and medieval periods. Study of the reformed Roman Liturgy of the Hours and of daily prayer in other traditions.

LTGY 424 Theology of Sacraments and Worship. (3)
The roots of Christian worship in symbol, language, and social dynamics. Theological reflection on the sacramental life in the Church. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament especially in relation to Trinitarian, theology, Christology, Pneumatology, Christian anthropology, and ecclesiology. Cross-listed with DOCT 424.

LTGY 467 Topics in Jewish Worship. (1-3)

LTGY 468 Topics in Liturgical Studies. (1-3)

LTGY 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

Liturgical Music
LMUS 407 Applied Organ. (0-2)
The development of technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level. Ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 Applied Voice. (0-2)
The fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy: breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc. Differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors, section leaders and coaches for cantors/song leaders in parishes.

LMUS 410 Gregorian Chant I. (1)
Introduction to Gregorian chant: historical development, notation, rhythm, modality, Latin pronunciation, editions and resources, use in the modern liturgy. Prior ability to read 5-line notation and some knowledge of the basics of music theory is expected.

LMUS 411 Gregorian Chant II. (1)
Overview of recent developments in semiology, i.e., interpreting chant according to the rhythmic indications of the earliest lineless notation. Paleographic study of the Metz and St. Gall neumes in the post-Vatican II Graduale Triplex. Rehearsal and conducting techniques, and use of chant in the modern liturgy. Prerequisite:  either LMUS 410 or extensive familiarity in singing 4-line notation.

LMUS 421 Psalmody/Hymnody. (3)
Psalmody--text, music, poetic expression--as its forms have evolved from ancient Jewish tradition. An examination of the forms, origins, numbering, translations and sources as they pertain to musical use. A survey of historical development of mainline Christian hymnody, authors, composers, styles, liturgical use. Current hymnals, styles of text, music and appropriateness for liturgical use will be scrutinized.

LMUS 431 Advanced Choral Conducting. (3)
Review of basic techniques. Application of advanced vocal and conducting techniques through studies of standard choral literature, representing various styles and forms. Special attention given to application of vocal techniques in the choral setting, gestures and their effects on singing. Curriculum will include score preparation, analysis of major choral works and special rehearsal techniques.

LMUS 433 Service Playing. (0-1)
The qualified church organist as leader and enabler of the assembly's singing. The course will require high proficiency levels of assembly leadership and accompaniment skills (hymns, masses, psalm forms) as well as vocal and choral accompaniment. Students will also develop abilities at sight-reading, modulation, transposing and extemporization.

LMUS 435 Service Leadership for Cantor/Song Leader. (0-1)
Historic role of cantor in Jewish and Christian liturgy. Applied techniques include: teaching of antiphonal music to the assembly; appropriate directing skills; the cantor's ritual moments, cantorial music resources. The role of congregational song leader as distinguished from that of cantor and choir director. Developing good song leading style, i.e., teaching new music to a congregation, learning appropriate directing techniques for congregational leadership. Sharpening vocal and musical styles for both ministries will be emphasized.

LMUS 439 Practicum. (1-2)
Direct involvement in actual liturgical music planning, rehearsing and implementing in a variety of liturgical forms. This is to be done in area churches and/or on-campus with permission and under supervision of the advisor with the aim of developing skills and the ability to integrate practice with musical and liturgical knowledge.

LMUS 468 Topics in Liturgical Music. (1-3)

LMUS 468 Final Project. (1-2)
The final project is developed in consultation with a student's faculty advisor. The project might be a lecture-recital or a research paper and public defense or a hymn festival.

LMUS 501 Seminar in Liturgical Music Techniques and Literature. (3)
Interpretation of music and liturgical theology. History of liturgical music; official documents; issues, problems, and positions in liturgical music practice; worship aid evaluation; presentation of music/liturgy plans.

Monastic Studies
MONS 402 Monastic History I: Pre-Benedict. (3)
The rise of monasticism within the early Church of East and West to the time of Benedict. Cross-listed with HHTH 413.

MONS 404 Monastic History II: Benedict to the Reformation. (3)
The development of Western monastic life and reform movements from the early Middle Ages through the fifteenth century. Cross-listed with HHTH 415.

MONS 406 Monastic History III: Reformation to the Present. (3)
The decline of Western monasticism in the sixteenth century through its revival in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Cross-listed with HHTH 417.

MONS 408 Contemporary Monasticism. (3)
The multiplicity of expressions of monastic life: from intentional communities to heritages, from traditional Benedictine and Cistercian communities to ecumenical, inter-faith and Protestant communities, from solely vowed religious to various forms of affiliation of lay membership. The  changing face of monasticism in the 21st century.

MONS 410 Rule of Benedict. (3)
The Rule and its sources; exegesis of the text; issues of interpretation.

MONS 412 Monastic Structures. (1)
The history of Benedictine monastic structures of governance, including individual monasteries and congregations. The present laws governing monasteries. The rights and obligations of monastics. Visions for the future.

MONS 421 Monastic Liturgy. (3)
The liturgical shape of organized monastic life: the Liturgy of the Hours, the Eucharist, rites of admission and profession, the consecration of virgins, the blessing of abbots and abbesses, rites of the refectory, rites of hospitality, the washing of feet, rites concerning faults, sin, and reconciliation, rites for the sick, dying and dead. 

MONS 423 Monastic Formation. (3)
The formation of the Christian in the context of the faith-giving community. Conversatio, stability and obedience. Conveying and supporting faith in the monastic context through eagerness for the work of God, for obedience and for humble service. Special emphasis on lectio divina. Examination of the ways monasticism has traditionally realized community: common prayer, common meals, common decision-making and common support of work.

MONS 434 Monastic Spiritual Theology. (3)
The development of monastic spiritual theology will be studied from the perspective of monastic primary sources. Texts will be studied as guides and sourcebooks for models of monastic spiritual progress and human maturity. Special emphasis will be placed on: (1) the original meanings of "active" and "contemplative" in the vocabulary of early monasticism; (2) models of spiritual development in th early church and in the early monastic movement; (3) the interrelationship between the genobitic and eremetic lifestyles; (4) the theory and practice of lectio divina; (5) the mystical interpretation of the scriptures and the practice of liturgical prayer; (6) monastic reform and renewal; (7) spiritual guidance in the monastic tradition. Cross-listed with SPIR 434.

MONS 435 Christian Asceticism. (3)
The development of Christian asceticism will be studied from the perspective of primary sources, drawn chiefly from the Christian monastic tradition. Texts will be studied as guides and sourcebooks for models of conversion, growth in human maturity, and spiritual progress. Special emphasis will be place on: (1) classical and Christian understandings of ascesis; (2) reepentance and the call to conversion as the basis for authentic ascetical practice; (3) the dynamic interrelationship between ascetical practice and contemplative vision; (4) philosophical and monastic models of virtue and vice; (5) the contrasting and interdependent asceticism of hermitage and cenobium; (6) friendship as the form and ascetical school of virtue; (7) spiritual exercises and the love of learning-implications for monastic reform and renewal. Cross-listed with SPIR 435.

MONS 436 Bible and Prayer. (3)
This course will examine early Christian and monastic attitudes toward the biblical text and the interplay between the Bible and forms of prayer. Topics will include: methods of interpreting the Bible; ways of encountering the Bible (reading, memorization, meditation), kinds of early monastic prayer and their biblical basis. There will also be some attention to the subsequent history of those traditions and a consideration of present-day implications. Cross-listed with SPIR 436.

MONS 437 Desert Ammas. (3)
Fourth century Christianity gave birth to a spirituality which called women out of conventional understandings of wife, courtesan, and/or mother into lives of prayer, service, and the founding of communal households and monasteries. An exploration of writings by and about such foremothers on the monastic movement as Macrina, Melania, Paula, Eustochium, Marcella, Syncletica, Mary of Egypt, and Egeria, their social and historical realities, and their influence then and now.

MONS 468 Topics in Monastic Studies. (1-3)

MONS 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

Spiritual Theology
SPIR 424 History of Christian Spirituality I. (3)
An exploration of the significant formative elements, experiences and writers of Christian spirituality in its first 700 years. Cross-listed with HHTH 424.

SPIR 425 History of Christian Spirituality II. (3)
A study of the Christian spirituality of the Middle Ages, especially from the end of the seventh century to the Reformation. Special attention will be given to notable figures, writings, events, institutions and movements that shaped the expression of Christian convictions and practice, up to the dawn of the "modern" period. Cross-listed with HHTH 425.

SPIR 426 History of Christian Spirituality III. (3)
The development of Christian spirituality from the Protestant and Catholic Reformations to the present. Also included will be events in Asia, Africa, North and Latin America. Cross-listed with HHTH 428.

SPIR 430 Theology and Spirituality. (3)
The relationship between concrete experience and theological inquiry as seen in the works of outstanding spiritual writers of the Christian tradition. Prayer in Christian life. Forms of spirituality and asceticism.

SPIR 431 Christian Prayer. (3)
A study of the place of prayer in Christian life, with special emphasis on the Our Father, using various classical commentaries as a case in point. Theological problems and considerations related to doctrine of prayer are included, e.g. discernment in prayer, content of prayer, polarities in prayer (such as its apophatic and mystical, individual and communitarian, sacramental and liturgical aspects), and laws of the spiritual life emanating from teachings on prayer.

SPIR 432 Spirituality and Mysticism (3)
The mystical dimension of Christianity as exemplified in ancient and modern mystics. Questions of discernment of true from false mysticism; comparative studies; influence of psychology on studies of mysticism to the Church.

SPIR 434 Monastic Spiritual Theology. (3)
The development of monastic spiritual theology will be studied from the perspective of monastic primary sources. Texts will be studied as guides and sourcebooks for models of monastic spiritual progress and human maturity. Special emphasis will be placed on: (1) the original meanings of "active" and "contemplative" in the vocabulary of early monasticism; (2) models of spiritual development in th early church and in the early monastic movement; (3) the interrelationship between the genobitic and eremetic lifestyles; (4) the theory and practice of lectio divina; (5) the mystical interpretation of the scriptures and the practice of liturgical prayer; (6) monastic reform and renewal; (7) spiritual guidance in the monastic tradition. Cross-listed with MONS 434.

SPIR 435 Christian Asceticism. (3)
The development of Christian asceticism will be studied from the perspective of primary sources, drawn chiefly from the Christian monastic tradition. Texts will be studied as guides and sourcebooks for models of conversion, growth in human maturity, and spiritual progress. Special emphasis will be place on: (1) classical and Christian understandings of ascesis; (2) reepentance and the call to conversion as the basis for authentic ascetical practice; (3) the dynamic interrelationship between ascetical practice and contemplative vision; (4) philosophical and monastic models of virtue and vice; (5) the contrasting and interdependent asceticism of hermitage and cenobium; (6) friendship as the form and ascetical school of virtue; (7) spiritual exercises and the love of learning-implications for monastic reform and renewal. Cross-listed with MONS 435.

SPIR 436 Bible and Prayer. (3)
This course will examine early Christian and monastic attitudes toward the biblical text and the interplay between the Bible and forms of prayer. Topics will include: methods of interpreting the Bible; ways of encountering the Bible (reading, memorization, meditation), kinds of early monastic prayer and their biblical basis. There will also be some attention to the subsequent history of those traditions and a consideration of present-day implications. Cross-listed with MONS 436.

SPIR 467 Topics in Jewish Spirituality. (3)

SPIR 468 Topics in Spirituality. (1-3)

SPIR 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

For other courses closely related to the study of Christian Spirituality, see:
PTHM 402 The Development of Religious Identity. (3)
PTHM 418 Dynamics of Spiritual Direction. (3)

Pastoral Theology and Ministry
PTHM 401 Evangelization and Catechesis. (3)
This course examines contemporary theologies and principles of evangelization and catechesis; theories of human and faith development; and various models and methods of evangelization and catechesis. Particular attention will be given to advancing catechetical leadership skills in assessment and strategic planning for program improvement.

PTHM 402 Youth Ministry. (3)
This course will explore the vision and practice of Catholic youth ministry within the framework of a theology of evangelization and catechesis. Emphasis will be placed on exploring contextual issues facing youth and families. Particular attention will be given to developing research methodology for assessing the youth ministry programs with the purpose of program improvement.

PTHM 405 Introduction to Pastoral Ministry (3)
This course introduces students to the theology of ministry, including historical and contemporary theologies of ordained and lay ministry. Students also explore basic methods in the practice of ministry.

PTHM 408 Introduction to Pastoral Care. (3)
The course addresses theological approaches to the “care of souls,” including theologies of suffering, grief, and death. Students develop skills in interpersonal dynamics of listening, empathy, systems assessment, professional judgment, and liturgical response in relationship to pastoral care of persons and communities.

PTHM 411 Leadership in the Christian Community. (3)
Students will explore contemporary theories of leadership and how they relate to effective styles of pastoral leadership in a variety of ministry contexts.

PTHM 412 Basic Clinical Pastoral Education. (4)
Students are required to participate in a basic unit of an accredited Clinical Pastoral Education program.Clinical pastoral education at an accredited center.

PTHM 413 Theology of Lay and Ordained Ministry. (3) 
Students study the biblical foundations, historical development, systematic theology, and canonical structures of ordained and lay ministry in the Church. Cross-listed with DOCT 413.

PTHM 417 Homiletics. (3)
Development of speaking, reading, and preaching skills at the eucharist and in other liturgical contexts such as marriage and family counseling or counseling the chemically dependent. Prerequisite: PTHM 408.

PTHM 418 Dynamics of Spiritual Direction. (3)
The study of spiritual direction allows students to develop skills in guiding others to identify and articulate their relationship with God through the life of faith, religious experience, discernment, and prayer. Students learn various models of spiritual direction and the purpose and dynamics of peer and individual supervision.

PTHM 419 Advanced Spiritual Direction. (1-3)

PTHM 420 Introduction to Ecclesiastical Law. (3)
Students study the theology, history and general principles of Church law. Students will build capacity to effectively analyze and solve canonical cases.

PTHM 422 Matrimonial Jurisprudence. (2-3)
This course focuses on specialized training in modern tribunal and administrative determinations of civilly dissolved marriages. Students examine modern annulment practices in local dioceses.

PTHM 425 Pastoral Liturgy I. (3)
Students will study the development and theology of Christian Initiation, the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, the Rite for the Baptism of infants, the Rite of Confirmation, the Order of the Mass, and the history, theology and pastoral use of the liturgical year and calendar. The course includes practica with videotaping for the development of ministerial skills, especially liturgical presidency.

PTHM 427 Pastoral Liturgy II. (3)
Students will study the history, theology and pastoral celebration of the rites of Christian Marriage, Reconciliation (communal and individual), Anointing of the Sick, Christian funerals, and the Liturgy of the Hours in parishes. The course includes practica with videotaping for the development of ministerial skills.

PTHM 450 Church Administration. (3)
This course allows students to explore the theology and practice of administration in relationship to: leadership theory, parish governance, human resources, financial systems, facility management, office services, technology management, and conflict management.

PTHM 451 Ministry through the Lifecycle. (3)
This course will provide an overview of pastoral and spiritual issues that ministers encounter with individuals and families in various life stages. Issues included in the course also include the lifecycle of a family and the cycle of healing for people.

PTHM 456 Rural Social Issues. (3)
Students will learn about major social issues affecting rural America, the social justice dimensions of these issues, and their implications for ministry in the Church. Cross-listed with MORL 456.

PTHM 457 Sacramental Catechesis. (1)
This course addresses catechetical methods for initiation into the sacramental life of the church and discipleship, including the sacraments of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, reconciliation, and marriage. Issues of liturgical catechesis, readiness of candidates, preparation of the community and families will be incorporated.

PTHM 458 Social Ministry. (3)
This course examines social outreach programs, which include direct service ministries such as homeless shelters, prison ministry, food pantries, as well as initiatives that address systemic social, political and economic change. Students explore how the Catholic social teaching traditions inform a broad range of ministries at the parish, diocesan, and national levels.

PTHM 459 Practicum in Pastoral Ministry. (1-6)
Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires the students to integrate theological knowledge with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

PTHM 465 Integration Seminar. (3)
This course marks the culmination of the student’s preparation for ministry. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and construct a response to pastoral situations utilizing biblical, theological, historical, and social scientific resources.

PTHM 468 Topics in Pastoral Theology. (1-3)

PTHM 469 Topics in Canon Law. (1-3)

PTHM 470 Independent Study. (1-3)

Languages

The following courses are designed to assist students in preparing for the language proficiency exam through an overview of the grammatical structure of the language and practice in reading short paragraphs. (Pass/Fail grading.) Credit is not applicable to graduate degrees. (See Scripture section for details on Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek.)

LANG 401 Reading Latin in the Humanities I. (3)
LANG 402 Reading Latin in the Humanities II. (3)

LANG 403 Reading French in the Humanities I. (3)
LANG 404 Reading French in the Humanities II. (3)

LANG 405 Reading German in the Humanities I. (3)
LANG 406 Reading German in the Humanities II. (3)

LANG 407 Reading Spanish in the Humanities I. (3)
LANG 408 Reading Spanish in the Humanities II. (3)