Classical Languages

Major in Classical Studies (40-56 credits)

This major combines the study of language and literature, history, philosophy, and art for an interdisciplinary approach to classical antiquity. See "Humanities," pages 145-147 for details.

Major in Classics (34 credits)

This major emphasizes the study of languages and literature.

Required Courses:
Seven upper-division courses in either Greek (for a Greek concentration) or Latin (for a Latin concentration) or a combination of the two (for a classics concentration), plus 398 or 399. Of the seven additional courses, one may be in classical literature or civilization in translation or (with permission of department chair) in a related field.

Suggestions:
Students are strongly urged to take two courses in related fields. Such courses should be chosen to fulfill core curriculum requirements.

Minor (16 credits)

The department offers minors in Latin and Greek.

Required Courses:
After completing the language proficiency sequence, three additional upper-division courses in either Latin or Greek.

Greek Courses (GREK)

115, 116 Intensive Beginning Greek. (6, 6)
This two semester course covers the twelve credit language requirement in two semesters. By the end of spring term, students will be able to read Greek at an intermediate level. The last mod in the spring will concentrate on biblical Greek. Classes meet Monday-Friday, 2:40-3:35 p.m.

271 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

327 Topics in Greek Literature. (4)
A selected topic in Greek literature, such as the Attic orators, lyric poetry, the novel, church literature, or prose composition. This course may be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

332 Topics in Greek Historians. (4)
Reading of one or more Greek historians, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon. Emphasis on methodology, style, function of speeches, views of causality, origins of war, and the weighing and presentation of evidence. This course may be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

341 Homer and Epic Poetry. (4)
A detailed analysis of the Odyssey or the Iliad; the entire work in translation, selected readings in the original. The "oral epic" and Homer's influence on Greek morality, culture, and literature.

342 Greek Tragedy. (4)
Reading of one or more plays by Sophocles, Euripides, or Aeschylus read in the original, and several in translation, noting each poet's outlook and dramatic technique.

345 Studies in Plato. (4)
Reading of a Platonic dialogue (Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Symposium, etc.) with emphasis on the technique of the Socratic dialogue, prose style, Plato's view of the soul, and the theory of forms.

371 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

398 Honors Senior Essay, Research, or Creative Project. (4)
Required for graduation with "Distinction in Classics." Prerequisite: HONR 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see HONR 398.

399 Senior Project. (2)
Unless they complete 398 (above), all majors must present a senior project in a public forum. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students choose a project appropriate to their previous course of study and/or their individual goals.

Latin Courses (LATN)

111, 112 Introduction to Latin. (4,4)
The elements of classical Latin, its grammatical structure and forms, with a basic vocabulary. Development of reading skill through a varied selection of ancient texts in prose and verse.

211 Intermediate Latin. (4)
Review and completion of the fundamentals of Latin, including the reading of passages from classical texts. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the core foreign language proficiency.

271 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

327 Topics in Latin Literature. (4)
A selected topic in Latin literature, such as classical rhetoric, Lucretius, Cicero, Ovid, the novel, philosophy, satire, medieval Latin, or Christian literature. This course may be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

331 Virgil and Epic Poetry. (4)
Virgil's Aeneid: Latin readings in the first six books; the entire work in translation. The influence of Homer and of Alexandrian poetry and the unique quality of Virgil's poetic art.

333 Elegiac and Lyric Poetry. (4)
Readings in Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid, and Horace, with emphasis on a close explication of the Latin text and on the characteristics of classical poetry. Development of Roman elegiac and lyric forms.

338 Roman Comedy. (4)
Reading of one or more plays of Plautus or Terence, with emphasis on the techniques of New Comedy, situation, characterization and plot, the play's subsequent influence, and perhaps comparison with a later treatment of the theme, as by Shakespeare.

349 Roman Historians. (4)
Reading of one or more Roman historians, such as Livy, Caesar, Tacitus, Suetonius, Sallust, or Josephus. Emphasis on methodology, style, function of speeches, views of causality, origins of war, and the weighing and presentation of evidence.

371 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

398 Honors Senior Essay, Research, or Creative Project. (4)
Required for graduation with "Distinction in Classics." Prerequisite: HONR 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see HONR 398.

399 Senior Project. (2)
Unless they complete 398 (above), all majors must present a senior project in a public forum. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students choose a project appropriate to their previous course of study and/or their individual goals.