Physical Education

Department Chair: Don Fischer

Faculty:Amanda Anderson, Julie Deyak, Donald Fischer, John Gagliardi, Jerry Haugen, John Haws, Dennis Johnson, Janna LaFountaine, Tim Miles, Mary Pieklo, Doug Schueller

Exercise and physical activity play an important role in improving the quality of life of individuals, including decreasing the risk of disease and injury. The mission of the Exercise Science and Sports Studies Department is to prepare liberally educated men and women for graduate study in exercise related fields, and to prepare students to function professionally and competently in the fields of exercise science and coaching. Consistent with the Coordinate Mission of the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University, the department seeks to foster integrated learning, critical thinking, strong communication skills, exploration of age and gender related issues, and provide leadership and service opportunities for students.

The Exercise Science and Sports Studies Department carries out its mission through two curricular programs: the Coaching Certification Program and the Minor in Sports Medicine. The department also supports the Common Curriculum by offering three courses that fulfill Common Curriculum requirements. The Gender and Sport course is also cross-listed with the Gender and Women's Studies major. 

Assessment

The Exercise Science and Sports Studies Department is committed to the process of formative assessment in order to improve student learning. The assessment process employs a variety of assessment measures including (but not limited to):

  1. Embedded assessment of student learning within Exercise Science and Sports Studies Department courses
  2. Survey of senior students and graduates
  3. Survey of Internship or Practicum site supervisors regarding student performance relative to curricular learning goals

Major (None)

Coaching Certification CSB/SJU

(10 credits and a zero credit practicum)

The coaching certification curriculum utilizes the American Sport Education Program (ASEP) model and meets the National Standards for Athletic Coaches.

Requirements:
201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 208, 209, and 351. Plus one (1) theory course (259-270). In addition, ESSS XXX(B) must be satisfactorily completed. Students must have completed the Coaching Certification courses or be enrolled in the remaining required courses at the time they register for ESSS XXX(B), with the exception of ESSS 351 which can be completed after completing ESSS XXX(B). Students will need to hold current certification for First Aid/Adult CPR at the time of your employment.

Sports Medicine Minor

(24 credits with 20 credits from the required courses and 4 credits from the list of electives)

The minor curriculum in Sports Medicine is  designed to explore the relationship between exercise and the achievement of optimal health and peak athletic performance. Through coursework and a variety of "hands on" practical learning experiences, students learn anatomical, biomechanical, physiological, and medical related concepts while developing effective communication and critical thinking skills. Graduates will be prepared for professional and graduate study in exercise science, and allied health fields. The Sports Medicine minor is recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association for meeting its high standards in the areas of strength and conditioning education. It is recommended that students work closely with a faculty advisor in choosing courses to best achieve their academic goals. 

Requirements:
175, 258, 273, 274, 275, 306, 307, 308, XXX(A), and four additional credits from ESSS 397, BIOL 326, COLG 130, MATH 124, NUTR 125, PSYC 221, PSYC 311, PSYC 343.

Courses (ESSS)

175 Principles of Athletic Training. (2)
In this course students will learn and apply fundamental theoretical and practical concepts relative to risk management, including administrative and legal issues; preventing athletic injuries through conditioning, nutrition, protective equipment, and addressing environmental issues; and managing athletic injuries through on-the-field assessment, treatment of acute and non-acute injuries, and the use of universal precautions in preventing the transmission of bloodborne pathogens. Fall and spring.

201 Introduction to Coaching. (1)
This course provides an overview of coaching with emphasis on coaching philosophy, style, leadership and ethics. It is highly recommended that this course be taken early in the curriculum. Fall and spring.

202 Sport Psychology. (1)
This course will assist future coaches in becoming skillful communicators, motivators, and  managers of athlete behavior. Fall and spring.

203 Coaching Methods. (1)
Students will discuss and apply fundamental concepts necessary for effective teaching of technical and tactical skills. Fall and Spring.

204 Sport Nutrition and Drugs. (1)
In this course, students will discuss and apply the role of various nutrients in sport performance and in determining body composition. Issues related to drug and supplement use and the coach’s role in recognizing and addressing these issues will also be discussed. Fall and spring.

205 Sport Administration. (1)
This course will explore coaching issues related to risk and team management. Fall and spring.

208 Sports Physiology. (2)
This course will explore principles related to safe and effective exercise training. Students will apply these principles to the various stages of the training cycle in order to optimize the effects of training. Training differences in gender and age will also be explored.  Fall and spring.

209 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. (2)
This course will examine the role of the coach in planning for, preventing and responding to sport related injuries. This course is designed for students pursuing a Coaching Certificate. Fall and spring.

258 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Sports Medicine. (2)
This course is primarily a lecture course covering basic human anatomy and physiology with emphasis placed on the muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. This course is designed to provide the student a foundational understanding of anatomical and physiological terminology and concepts. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or 121. Fall and spring.

259 Theory of Coaching Ice Hockey. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of ice hockey. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

260 Theory of Coaching Football. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of football. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring.  S/U grading only.

261 Theory of Coaching Basketball. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of basketball. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Fall, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

263 Theory of Coaching Track and Cross Country. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of track and field and cross country. Practice planning and drill work, meet preparation, as well as competition rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Fall, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

264 Theory of Coaching Baseball. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of baseball. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

267 Theory of Coaching Soccer. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of soccer. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

269 Theory of Coaching Volleyball. (1)
Coaching of skills, strategy and theories of volleyball. Emphasis to include drill work, practices, contest planning and rules. Fall, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

270 Theory of Coaching Softball. (1)
Coaching of skills, strategy and theories of softball. Emphasis also to include drill work, practices, contest planning and rules. Spring, alternate years.  S/U grading only.

273 Health and Fitness. (4)
In this course, students will discuss and apply foundational concepts in exercise, disease prevention and management, and wellness.  Beyond studying the physiological changes to various types of exercise, students will apply course concepts in designing individualized exercise programs for healthy and special populations.  Students in the course will also examine gender, age, sexuality, race, culture, class, ethnicity, and behavioral differences that influence exercise habits, general health, and chronic diseases.  In the laboratory portion of the course, students will assess their own fitness using traditional field tests and health screening and risk appraisal tools.  Prerequisites:  ESSS 258 or BIOL 214 or BIOL 325 and 326.  Fall.

274 Motor Learning. (1)
In this course students will learn fundamental concepts of motor learning and apply the concept by instructing proper exercise techniques. Analytical skills will be developed through the analysis of exercise techniques and error correction. Students enrolled in this course will actively participate in exercise techniques. Fall.

275 Techniques in Athletic Training. (1)
In this course students will integrate and apply knowledge and develop practical skills related to the taping and wrapping of injuries, assessing and managing on-the-field injuries, and the treatment of acute and chronic injuries. Students are required to demonstrate competency in specified techniques. Prerequisite: 175. Fall and spring.

306 Kinesiology. (4)
In this course students will integrate and apply fundamental anatomical, physiological and biomechanical concepts of human movement. Students will use course concepts to evaluate complex movements such as running and throwing. The laboratory component of the course will emphasize analytical and problem solving skills through the qualitative and quantitative assessment of human movement. Prerequisites: ESSS 258 or BIOL 214 or BIOL 325 and 326; completion of the Core/Common Curriculum math requirement. Recommended: PHYS 105 or 191. Fall.

307 Advanced Injury Assessment. (2)
In this course students will learn and apply fundamental theoretical and practical concepts relative to assessing and managing common athletic injuries, primarily of the extremities. Students will develop critical thinking skills by identifying injuries based on relevant signs/symptoms and by identifying management strategies based on the nature of the injury. Students will also learn to effectively communicate through written SOAP notes. Prerequisites: ESSS 175; ESSS 258 or BIOL 214 or BIOL 325 and 326. Fall.

308 Exercise Physiology. (4)
In this course students will advance their understanding of the human body's physiological response to exercise.  Topics include acute responses and chronic adaptations of the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, hormonal, and bioenergetics systems to exercise induced stress, environmental influences on performance and gender differences will also be explored.  In the laboratory portion of the course students will practice the scientific method by assessing physiological capacities using the laboratory assessment methods.  Prerequisites:  273; ESS 258 or NIOL 214 or BIOL 325 and 325;  Math 118 or MATH 119 or MATH 124 or PSYC 221 or SOCI 201.  Spring.

320 Gender and Sport. (2)
This course examines the role gender played and continues to play in shaping sport in our society. Students will examine topics such as Title IX, gender and social context, and the representation of female athletes in the media. This course is cross-listed with the Gender and Women's Studies major and carries the Common Curriculum Gender Designation. Spring.

351 Coaching Practicum. (0)
This course is designed to provide the student with experience of coaching a sport at a high school level for an entire season. Prerequisite: completion of at least 7 credits in the Coaching Certification curriculum, including PHED 209 (or by approval of the Coaching Certification Program Supervisor). Practicum must be planned with the Coaching Certification Program Supervisor. Fall and Spring.

397 Sports Medicine Internship. (2-8)
Internship in an approved setting. Work experience in an area of sports medicine supervised by agency personnel and department coordinator. All internships need to be planned with the CSB/SJU internship office one semester prior to work experience.

XXX(A) Assessment of Student Learning for Sports Medicine Minor. (0)
This course is designed to assess the students' experiences within the Sports Medicine program and to assist in the assessment of the overall program. The assessment methods will include, but are not limited to, a survey regarding the quality of the program. This course is to be completed in the student’s final semester prior to graduation. S/U grading only.

XXX(B) Assessment of Student Learning for Coaching Certification. (0)
This course is designed to assess the students' experiences within the Coaching Certification program and to assist in the assessment of the overall program. The assessment methods will include, but are not limited to, a survey regarding the quality of the program.  This course is to be completed in the student’s final semester prior to graduation. S/U grading only.